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Board of Continuing Education: Notice

INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOLS 2001: PLENARY LECTURE SERIES

In 2001 the International Division of the Board of Continuing Education celebrates its seventy-eighth year of arranging International Summer Schools. Over 1,000 visitors will come to the University for periods of study lasting from two to six weeks. At the core of each Summer School are small special study classes, usually taught by members of the University. Each programme also offers plenary lectures for all participants in that Summer School, and experts from within the University and beyond are invited to contribute to these series.

These lectures have been very well received in the past, and the organizers of the Summer Schools would like, where possible, to make them more widely accessible to those with research and teaching interests in the subject concerned. The lectures are not open to the public, but where space in the lecture hall permits, we are willing to make places available for members of the University to attend the plenary lectures which interest them most.

Please note: members of the University may be asked to confirm their status to one of the Board's staff in attendance at the lecture hall. We would be grateful if those wishing to attend any of these lectures would notify us in advance. Contact details are given at the end of this list.

International Summer School: plenary lecture series

The first term of the Board of Continuing Education's sixty-sixth International Summer School will take place from Monday, 9 July to Friday, 3 August. The talks in this series of lectures follow the theme of Memory. The topics have been chosen to stimulate interest amongst a group of students whose own interests are necessarily very diverse. Interpretations are far-reaching: subjects range from the historical (the Greeks, the early middle ages, the Cold War), to botanical, literary, legal, materials science, and medical aspects of this theme. Lectures take place on weekday mornings, in the Lady Mitchell Hall. They begin promptly at 10.30 a.m., and finish at 11.30 a.m. The series is arranged for the c. 300 participants on the International Summer School, but members of the University are cordially invited to attend.

Wednesday,  11 July Human memory and its disorders, by Professor John Hodges
Thursday,  12 July History and memory in the early middle ages, by Professor Rosamond McKitterick
Friday,  13 July The remembrance of things past: a plant's perspective, by Professor John Parker
Monday, 16 July Memory - how safe is the criminal law?, by Andrew Hurst
Tuesday, 17 July Children's eyewitness memory: sex, lies, and videotape, by Professor Graham Davies
Wednesday, 18 July Remembering the slave trade, by Dr Sue Benson
Thursday, 19 July 'Lost beyond the reach of thought': Wordsworth and memory, by Mr John Gilroy
Friday, 20 July The Cold War and historical memory, by Dr Mike Sewell
Monday, 23 July Metals with memories: the magic of modern materials, by Professor Colin Humphreys
Tuesday, 24 July The Greeks for all: popular histories, by Professor Paul Cartledge
Wednesday, 25 July Memories of animals, by Professor Nick Mackintosh
Thursday, 26 July Memory and nationalism, by Professor James Mayall
Friday, 27 July Remembering Robin Hood, by Professor Stephen Knight
Monday, 30 July Memory and the management of information, by Dr Peter Robinson
Tuesday, 31 July Reflections on the memory boom, by Dr Jay Winter

Additional general lectures given in the evening, from 8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Wednesday, 11 July The general election - who won and why, by Dr Tom Ling
Monday, 16 July Kitchen sink dramas and the Weimar Republic: how where you wash up makes you what you are, by Dr Leif Jerram
Monday, 23 July Radio London and political warfare in World War II, by Dr Michael Stenton
Thursday, 26 July Britain and Ireland, by Mr John Jackson
Monday, 30 July The monarchy, by Dr Rick Yates
Tuesday, 31 July The poisoned chalice - British politics and the European Union, by Mr David Weigall

Summer School in Art History: plenary lecture series

The Summer School in Art History will take place from Sunday, 8 July to Saturday, 28 July. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is Art, light, and space from the middle ages to the present. Morning lectures take place in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, on the Sidgwick Site at the times given below.

Monday, 9 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Art, light, and space from the middle ages to the seventeenth century: an introduction, by Mr Nicholas Friend
11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Light and Byzantine mosaics, by Dr Liz James
Tuesday, 10 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Gothic illumination, by Dr Paul Binski
Wednesday, 11 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Renaissance shadows, by Mr Nicholas Friend
Thursday, 12 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Lighting and the English country house, by Mr James Lomax
Friday, 13 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Light in Rembrandt, by Dr Christopher Wright
11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Light and space from the Rococo to Impressionism, by Mr Nicholas Friend
2.00 p.m. - 3 p.m. Romantic light and colour, by Dr John Gage
Monday, 16 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Colour and light in stained glass, by Dr Carola Hicks
11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Pictorial composition, by Professor Thomas Puttfarken
Tuesday, 17 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Light in Christopher Wren, by Dr James Campbell
Wednesday, 18 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Colour and space in sixteenth-century Venice, by Dr Paul Hills
5 p.m. - 6 p.m. Light and dark in Caravaggio, by Dr Helen Langdon
Friday, 20 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Drawing on light: English watercolours from Girtin to Cotman, by Mr Nicholas Friend
11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Light and space in Turner, by Dr James Hamilton
Monday, 23 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Light and space from Monet to Cézanne, by Ms Mary Acton
11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Light and space in the twentieth century: an introduction, by Mr Nicholas Friend
Tuesday, 24 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Light in Thirties' architecture, Dr Alan Powers
Wednesday, 25 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Light and space in twentieth-century design, by Professor Jonathan Woodham
Thursday, 26 July  9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. The nature of sculpture: light, space, and volume in twentieth-century sculpture, by Mr Nicholas Usherwood
Friday, 27 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Kettle's Yard: light and space as a way of life, by Mr Michael Harrison
11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Crossing the Atlantic: the St Ives School and International Abstraction, by Mr Nicholas Friend

Additional lectures given in the evening in Wolfson Court, Clarkson Road, from 8.15 p.m. to 9.15 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Wednesday, 11 July Light and space in architecture from Mannerism to Modernism, by Mr David Dernie
Monday, 16 July Reflections on the Baroque, by Professor Robert Harbinson
Tuesday, 17 July Light in Joseph Wright of Derby, by Professor Stephen Daniels
Wednesday, 18 July Light and dark in Caravaggio, by Dr Helen Langdon
Thursday, 19 July Conservation: a different light on paintings, by Dr Spike Bucklow
Wednesday, 25 July Light, colour, and the Universe, by Dr Robin Catchpole

Summer School in History: plenary lecture series

The Summer School in History will take place from Sunday, 8 July to Saturday, 28 July. The theme for this year's morning plenary lecture series is Power. Morning lectures take place in Lecture Block, Room 3, on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 9.15 a.m., and end at 10.30 a.m., except for the lecture on Monday, 9 July, which starts at 9.30 a.m.

Monday, 9 July Is a court of law the right place to decide historical issues such as holocaust denial?, by Professor Richard Evans
Tuesday, 10 July Music and the representation of power, by Professor Tim Blanning
Wednesday, 11 July Revolutions: success and failure, 1789-1871, by Dr Robert Tombs
Thursday, 12 July American power in the American century, by Dr John Thompson
Friday, 13 July Charlemagne and the power of the Franks, by Professor Rosamond McKitterick
Monday, 16 July The state and sanity, by Professor Roy Porter
Tuesday, 17 July Power and the end of the Empire, by Professor James Mayall
Wednesday, 18 July Successions in Byzantium, by Dr Peter Sarris
Thursday, 19 July State and society in Imperial Russia, by Dr Hubertus Jahn
Monday, 23 July Women and the state in twentieth-century America, by Professor Tony Badger
Tuesday, 24 July Mussolini's seizure of power, by Professor Jonathan Steinberg
Wednesday, 25 July Power in slave societies, by Dr Betty Wood
Thursday, 26 July Local power to state power: poor relief in England, by Dr Richard Smith
Friday, 27 July The Ancient Greeks and popular power, by Dr Paul Millett

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Little Hall, from 8.15 p.m. to 9.15 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Monday, 9 July Louis XIV, art, and power, by Professor Peter Burke
Wednesday, 11 July Theories of liberty in historical perspective, by Professor Quentin Skinner
Monday, 16 July Transfers of power in seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland, by Professor John Morrill
Tuesday, 17 July Crown and Parliament: the problem of power in early modern England, by Dr David Smith
Wednesday, 18 July If knowledge is power, what is the history of information?, by Dr Claire Warwick
Monday, 23 July Projections of Soviet power, by Dr Jonathan Haslam
Thursday, 26 July The rise of religious toleration: principles, pluralism, and power, by Dr John Coffey

Shakespeare Summer School: plenary lecture series

The Shakespeare Summer School will take place from Sunday, 8 July to Saturday, 28 July. Morning lectures take place in Lecture Block Room 3 on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 11.30 a.m., and end at 12.30 p.m.

Monday, 9 July Shakespeare's character, by Dr Charles Moseley
Tuesday, 10 July Hamlet's and Hamlets, by Professor Cedric Watts
Wednesday, 11 July Shakespearean puzzles, by Professor Cedric Watts
Thursday, 12 July Jonson and Shakespeare, by Professor Ian Donaldson
Friday, 13 July Hamlet and the tragedy of revenge, by Professor Laurence Lerner
Monday, 16 July ''Hamlet' again', by Mr John Kerrigan
Tuesday, 17 July Shakespeare's hardware: the Globe and its uses, by Professor Andrew Gurr
Wednesday, 18 July Shakespeare's software: the antithesis of cinema, by Professor Andrew Gurr
Thursday, 19 July Shakespeare and the arts of rhetoric, by Professor Sylvia Adamson
Monday, 23 July This malapert blood: the duel in 'Twelfth Night', by Professor Richard Wilson
Tuesday, 24 July Shakespeare and that half-suspected desire, by Dr Philippa Berry
Wednesday, 25 July Shakespeare, Montaigne, and natural behaviour, by Dr Fred Parker
Thursday, 26 July Shakespeare, Jonson, and Rome, by Professor Inga-Stina Ewbank
Friday, 27 July 'Where late the sweet bird sang', by Dr Eamon Duffy

Additional lectures given in the evening, from 8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Wednesday, 11 July Watching a Shakespeare play, by Professor Trevor Whittock
Monday, 16 July What makes theatre theatre?, by Mr Nicholas Hytner
Thursday, 19 July 'Hero and Leander', by Dr Philippa Berry and Mr Clive Wilmer
Monday, 23 July Why this is hell: Marlowe and the Devil's pact, by Professor Richard Wilson

Science Summer School: plenary lecture series

The Science Summer School will take place from Sunday, 15 July to Saturday, 4 August. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is Life on the edge. Lectures take place in the Trust Room, Fitzwilliam College at the times given below.

Monday, 16 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Philosophy on the edge of science, by Professor Peter Lipton
11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. Does it all end in 2020!, by Professor Brian Johnson
Tuesday, 17 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Life at the limits: protective bio-chemicals in extreme habitats on Earth and Mars, by Dr David D. Wynn Williams
Friday, 20 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Species on the edge: finch and chimps, by Dr Adrian Friday
11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. Eyes on the edge, by Professor Stephen Laughlin
Monday, 23 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Mid-ocean ridges: life in the fiery deep, by Dr Lucy MacGregor
11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. The search for extra solar planets, by Dr Cathie Clarke
Tuesday, 24 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Living with salt - plants and salinity, by Professor Roger Leigh
Wednesday, 25 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Human memory and its disorders, Professor John Hodges
Friday, 27 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Ring of ice: southern ocean and global climate, by Dr Julian Priddle
11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. Would you swim in the Antarctic?, by Dr Julian Priddle
Monday, 30 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Freezing and boiling, flying and burrowing: taking life to extremes I, by Professor Simon Conway-Morris
11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. Freezing and boiling, flying and burrowing: taking life to extremes II, by Professor Simon Conway-Morris
Tuesday, 31 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. 'Going out on a limb': how tropical rainforest epiphytes cope with environmental extremes, by Professor Howard Griffiths
Wednesday, 1 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. The second law of thermodynamics - or, how to make an ice cube, by Dr Peter Wothers
Thursday, 2 August 9 a.m. - 10.15 a.m. From dreaming spires to 'All Creatures Great and Small': preparing veterinary scientists for practical careers, by Mr Graham Bilbrough
Friday, 3 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. What is the universe made of?, by Professor Andy Fabian
11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. Predicting the unpredictable, by Professor John Barrow

Additional lectures given in the evening, from 8.15 p.m. to 9.15 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Monday, 16 July Nanotechnology and carbon nanotubes: life at the bottom, by Dr Colm Durkan
Tuesday, 17 July Antarctica - the last great wilderness: an audio-visual experience, by Dr Julian Paren
Wednesday, 18 July The algebra of genes, the geometry of the cells, and the architecture of animal embryos, by Dr Alfonso Martinez Arias
Monday, 23 July Memories of animals, by Professor Nick Mackintosh
Monday, 30 July To clone or not to clone? That is the question, by Dr Nancy Lane
Tuesday, 31 July The three magic ingredients of boomerangs, by Dr Hugh Hunt

Medieval Studies Summer School: plenary lecture series

The Medieval Studies Summer School will take place from Sunday, 29 July to Saturday, 18 August. Morning lectures take place in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, on the Sidgwick Site, at the times shown below.

Monday, 30 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. The Black Death and medieval visual culture, by Dr Paul Binski
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. The past as a foreign culture: ritual in medieval England, by Professor Charles Phythian-Adams
Tuesday, 31 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. The Jews of Latin Christendom in the age of the Crusades, by Dr Anna Abulafia
Wednesday, 1 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Narcissus in medieval literature, by Dr Jane Gilbert
Thursday, 2 August 9 a.m. - 10.15 a.m. 'Stern, crude stuff': interpreting English church murals in context, by Ms Miriam Gill
Friday, 3 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Prophecy and political consciousness in medieval England, by Dr Lesley Coote
Monday, 6 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. The problem of identity I: madness, by Dr Sylvia Huot
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. The problem of identity II: monstrosity, by Dr Sylvia Huot
Tuesday, 7 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Understanding social space in the medieval house, by Dr Jane Grenville
Wednesday, 8 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Medieval gangsters: fact or fantasy, by Mr Richard Partington
Thursday, 9 August 9 a.m. - 10.15 a.m.The Anglo-Saxon village at West Stow and the medieval town and abbey of Bury St Edmunds, by Ms Alison Taylor
Friday, 10 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Reading St Katherine of Alexandria in later medieval England, by Dr Katherine Lewis
Monday, 13 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Bold as brass: the context of brasses and funerary sculpture in England in the Middle Ages, by Professor Nigel Saul
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. How others see us: status and self-image in late-medieval brasses, by Professor Nigel Saul
Tuesday, 14 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Towns, trade, and lordship in Europe, 1000-1300, by Professor Richard Britnell
Wednesday, 15 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. 'Go, little book': authors and readers in late medieval England, by Dr Julia Boffey
Thursday, 16 August 9 a.m. - 10.15 a.m. Sutton Hoo - burial ground of Kings, and Orford, a medieval castle and a planned town and port, by Ms Alison Taylor
Friday, 17 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m. Was there a (literary) Arthur of the Welsh?, by Dr Oliver Padel
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere: some illuminated manuscripts and their owners, by Ms Janet Backhouse

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Little Hall, on the Sidgwick Site, from 8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Tuesday, 31 July Religion and magic, by Dr Sophie Page
Friday, 3 August Introduction to medieval Norfolk churches and abbeys, by Dr Lynne Broughton
Monday, 6 August Aquinas and the Eucharist, by Dr Catherine Pickstock
Tuesday, 7 August Corn, cloth, and Colleges: the economy of medieval Cambridge and its region, by Dr John Lee
Wednesday, 8 August Romance and religion in the medieval garden, by Ms Caroline Holmes
Thursday, 9 August 'Manners maketh man'?: late-medieval courtesy books and their uses, by Dr Rosemary Horrox
Monday, 13 August Anglo-Saxon coinage as art, by Dr Anna Gannon
Wednesday, 15 August King John's nemesis: the real Constance of Brittany, by Dr Judith Everard

Summer School in English Literature: plenary lecture series

The Summer School in English Literature will take place from Sunday, 29 July to Saturday, 18 August. The theme of Literature and landscape has been chosen for this year's lectures, which take place in Lecture Block, Room 3 on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 11.30 a.m., and finish at 12.30 p.m.

Monday, 30 July 'Where every prospect pleases….', by Dr Charles Moseley
Tuesday, 31 July Vergilian perspectives, by Dr Phillip Hardie
Wednesday, 1 August Edward Thomas and the metaphysics of landscape, by Professor Stuart Sillars
Thursday, 2 August Jane Austen and the picturesque, by Dr Charlotte Grant
Friday, 3 August A world elsewhere: Shakespeare's sense of an exit, by Professor Richard Wilson
Monday, 6 August The gardens of Stowe: a [mis]guided phenomenon, by Dr Catherine Alexander
Tuesday, 7 August Landscape and poetry, by Professor Howard Erskine-Hill
Wednesday, 8 August Thomson's 'The Seasons', by Dr Alexander Lindsay
Thursday, 9 August Ruskin on landscape, by Mr Clive Wilmer
Monday, 13 August 'Hesperian fables true': Milton's Eden, by Professor Laurence Lerner
Tuesday, 14 August Thoreau and the construction of landscape, by Dr Andrew Taylor
Wednesday, 15 August Railways and the perception of landscape, by Professor John Woolford
Thursday, 16 August Pathetic fallacies, by Professor Sylvia Adamson
Friday, 17 August Thomas Hardy, by Dr Rod Mengham

Additional lectures given in the evening, from 8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., may also be of interest to members of the University (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

Monday, 6 August New shoots, old tips: a literary overview of practical gardening through the ages, by Ms Caroline Holmes
Wednesday, 8 August Romance and religion in the medieval garden, by Ms Caroline Holmes (in the Little Hall)
Thursday, 9 August Poetic landscapes, by Ms Caroline Holmes
Monday, 13 August Keats' landscape, by Professor Laurence Lerner

International Summer Schools: Joint evening lecture series

A number of lectures have been arranged for the benefit of more than one Summer School. These take place in the Lady Mitchell Hall, from 8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.

Tuesday, 10 July Cambridge: the early history, by Ms Alison Taylor
Friday, 13 July An introduction to 'Twelfth Night', by Professor Stuart Sillars
Wednesday, 18 July Shakespeare's England, England's Shakespeare, by Professor Stuart Sillars
Thursday, 19 July Secret worlds: intelligence communities, states, and citizens, by Professor Chris Andrew
Friday, 20 July An introduction to 'King Lear', by Professor Stuart Sillars
Wednesday, 25 July Witchcraft and power in early modern England, by Dr Malcolm Gaskill
Thursday, 2 August Introduction to 'Hamlet', by Dr Charles Moseley
Monday, 6 August Rediscovering Hampton Court Palace, by Mr Jonathan Foyle
Tuesday, 7 August Landscape and medieval literature, by Professor John Fyler
Wednesday, 8 August How to say NO to the most powerful man in the world. Medieval lawyers and the fine art of survival, by Dr Magnus Ryan
Thursday, 9 August One bright pearl: Zen Buddhism and reality, by Dr James Giles
Monday, 13 August The astrophysics and cosmology of the twenty-first century, by Professor Malcolm Longair
Wednesday, 15 August Listening to the twentieth century, by Dr Peter Martland

Your response to these lectures is invited

We would be interested to hear your response to any of the plenary lectures you have heard. If you have comments, or wish to know more about teaching on the Summer Schools, please write to Sarah Ormrod, Director of International Programmes, Board of Continuing Education, Madingley Hall, Madingley (tel. 140-216, e-mail sjo1001@cam.ac.uk).


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Cambridge University Reporter, 20 June 2001
Copyright © 2011 The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.