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Announcement of lectures, seminars, etc.

The following lectures, seminars, etc. will be open to members of the University and others who are interested:

History and Philosophy of Science. Departmental Seminars. Seminars are held on Thursdays at 4.30 p.m. in Seminar Room 2, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Free School Lane. Tea is available from 4 p.m. in Seminar Room 1.

15 January Thinking 'through numbers', by Hélène Mialet, of Harvard University.
22 January Between law and astronomy: Kepler, Galileo, and the uses of witnessing, by Mario Biagioli, of Harvard University.
29 January History and philosophy of regulatory science: the case of pharmaceuticals, by John Abraham, of the University of Sussex.
5 February Narratives in Greek mathematics?, by Markus Asper, of New York University.
12 February 'A falling star' - the sovereign self in Otto Weininger, by Louis Sass, of Rutgers University, New Jersey. This seminar will be held in the CRASSH Seminar Room, 17 Mill Lane.
19 February Scientia sexualis versus ars erotica: Foucault, van Gulik, Needham, Orientalism, by Leon Antonio Rocha, of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science.
26 February Consensus and disagreement in science, by Stephan Hartmann, of Tilburg University.
5 March On recent work on faultless disagreement, by Max Kolbel, of the University of Barcelona.

History of Medicine. Seminars are held on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. in Seminar Room 1, Department of History and Philosophy of Science. Tea is available from 4.40 p.m.

27 January Genetically ethnic? Medicine, heredity, and immigration in post-war Britain, by Roberta Bivins, of the University of Warwick.
10 February 'Atomism' and the criterion of truth: Asclepiades of Bithynia's appropriations of Epicureanism, by David Leith, of the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London.
17 February The diseased convict and the Australian voyage: medical knowledge, penal reform, and colonization, by Katherine Foxhall, of the University of Manchester.
24 February The radical moisture between theology and medicine (13th-14th centuries), by Chiara Crisciani, of the University of Pavia.
3 March How (not) to read the advertisements of oculists: records, testimonies, and the strategy of personal encounters in the early eighteenth century, by Karen Buckle, of the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London.
10 March Pregnancy, pathology, and public morals: making antenatal care in early twentieth century Edinburgh, by Salim Al-Gailani, of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science.

From Generation to Reproduction. These seminars, which are funded by the Department's Wellcome enhancement award in the history of medicine, are held on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. in Seminar Room 1, Department of History and Philosophy of Science. Tea is available from 4.40 p.m.

20 January Gynaecological fragments in a pragmatic archbishop's handbook: the Old English 'Formation of the Foetus' in context, by Conan Doyle, of the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic.
3 February Womb with a view: transforming obstetric ultrasound into a consumer experience, by Deborah Nicholson, of the University of the West of Scotland, Paisley.

Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Seminars are held on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in Seminar Room 2, Department of History and Philosophy of Science.

21 January Psychiatry as cognitive neuroscience, by Matthew Broome, of the University of Warwick.
4 February Recarving the cognitive joints of nature, by Mike Wheeler, of the University of Stirling.
18 February The phenomenology of the extended mind: why your beliefs are not in your iPhone, by Ron Chrisley, of the University of Sussex.
4 March How creative is evolutionary computation?, by Maggie Boden, of the University of Sussex.

Cabinet of Natural History. Seminars are held on Mondays at 1 p.m. in Seminar Room 1, Department of History and Philosophy of Science.

19 January Responding to Darwin: The Reverend Thomas Stebbing (1835-1926), clergyman, naturalist, and apologist, by Alison Wood, of King's College London.
26 January 'It is to do one's best to look without laughing': the spectacle of the kangaroo in late eighteenth century London, by Christopher Plumb, of the University of Manchester.
2 February The ends of the earth: rearticulating the image of the poles in the age of polar aviation, by Marionne Cronin, of the Scott Polar Research Institute.
9 February Long in the tooth: a study of a set of papier-mâché horses' teeth, by Becky Brown, of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science.
16 February J. B. S. Haldane on the role of disease in evolution (1949): sickle cell anaemia, ecology, evolutionary medicine, and feeding the world, by Andy Hammond, of University College London.
23 February Punishing bodies: image and ambiguity in the Lydian-Phrygian 'confession stelae', by Jessica Hughes, of the Open University.
2 March 'The unrecovered country': the non-drainage of the Fens, 1619-20, by Eric Ash, of Wayne State University.
9 March Distancing animals in medieval chronicles, by Brigitte Resl, of the University of Liverpool.

Zoology. The Michael Perkins Lecture 2009, entitled Endless flies most beautiful: cis regulatory sequences and the evolution of animal form, will be given by Professor Sean Carroll, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, at 5.15 p.m. on Thursday, 15 January 2009, in the Main Lecture Theatre, Department of Zoology, Downing Street.


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Cambridge University Reporter 07 January 2009
Copyright © 2009 The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.