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REPORT

Joint Report of the Council and the General Board on the introduction of a degree of Doctor of Engineering (the Eng.D.)

The COUNCIL and the GENERAL BOARD beg leave to report to the University as follows:

1. In this Report the Council and the General Board propose the introduction of a 'professional doctorate' in Engineering, titled the Eng.D., as an additional form of doctoral provision to supplement the existing arrangements for the Ph.D. Degree.

2. Professional doctorates, which are offered by many other UK universities, differ from the traditional Ph.D. in their purpose, nature, and titles. They provide doctoral training, through vocationally orientated advanced study and research, of specific relevance for particular professions to those expecting to enter, or who are already members of, those professions. The titles of the programmes and awards at other universities are subject-specific, intended to make clear the professional field in which each is offered.

3. Aside from the University's higher doctorates (which serve a different purpose), Cambridge's doctoral provision has been restricted, until relatively recently, to the full-time Ph.D. Degree. (The route to a Ph.D. on the basis of published work is restricted to graduates of the University.) In 2002-03, a part-time route to that Degree was introduced. In 2000-01, the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, intended to provide a form of doctoral training of particular relevance to the veterinary profession and an award with a specific and well understood status within that profession, was introduced.

4. The central bodies are well aware of their response to the remarks made at the Discussion of their Report on the establishment of the Vet.M.D. Degree (Reporter, 1999-2000, p. 166). At that Discussion one speaker expressed disquiet at the prospect of the University 'embarking on a whole new family of degrees'. In their response the central bodies gave an assurance that there was no such intention. However, for reasons set out in this Report, they are of the view that, if the University is unable to offer the Eng.D. Degree, it will be seriously disadvantaged by its inability to participate in what is now a very substantial move on the part of a major research council, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), towards channelling a large part of its research student funding towards collaborative doctoral training. Without provision for an Eng.D. Degree, some Departments will find it increasingly difficult to compete for high-quality UK research students for whom the attraction of pursuing a traditional Ph.D. in Cambridge will be outweighed by the significantly more generous funding available through the EPSRC for the Eng.D. Degree. In a broader context, the University must be in a position to engage with, and respond to, the policies of the research councils, if it is to avoid an erosion of its UK, publicly funded, postgraduate research student numbers. As recent Annual Reports by the Board of Graduate Studies have indicated, UK student demand for the Ph.D. is not as buoyant as it once was and the studentship policies of the research councils have been subject to considerable change. The introduction of an Eng.D. Degree would be a means of endeavouring to maintain the University's UK research student numbers, of attracting research students who might not otherwise pursue research at Cambridge, and of promoting further collaboration with industry.

5. The Ph.D. framework has hitherto been sufficiently flexible to allow for developments in the nature of doctoral training. It has, for example, been possible to incorporate in that framework an increase in formal taught elements in the early part of each student's programme of research and to allow the more explicit development, increasingly promoted by the research councils and the Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB), of general and transferable skills. However, the central bodies are persuaded that not all external developments in graduate training can be accommodated in a three-year course of independent research of the type undertaken through the Ph.D. A number of professional bodies and industrial organizations which sponsor doctoral study, particularly in engineering, now seek a form of doctoral training which cannot easily be encompassed within more traditional Ph.D. structures. The EPSRC has radically altered its form of research student funding from allocations to individual institutions of studentship quotas to two types of 'Training Accounts': Doctoral Training Accounts, in which the traditional Ph.D. framework can still be accommodated, and Collaborative Training Accounts which, at doctoral level, require adherence to that research council's Engineering Doctorate model. It is with this development that the proposals in this Report are particularly concerned.

6. The Council and the General Board consider it important that the University is suitably responsive to national developments in doctoral provision and research council policies. They are, however, conscious that there may be concerns about the proposed title of the degree. Professional doctorates differ in significant respects from the Ph.D. in their purposes, structures, and intended outcomes. It is therefore appropriate that their titles reflect these differences. It is clear that the title Eng.D. now has a recognized currency, at least so far as the EPSRC and collaborating organizations are concerned, and that it would not be possible for the University to exploit current and future opportunities without such a qualification. The Council and the General Board are also of the view that the title proposed is now so well established across the sector that it could not be confused with the University's higher doctorates. The title is consistent with the QAA's expectations, set out in that Agency's Framework for Higher Education Qualifications, that 'titles used for doctoral qualifications awarded after programmes with a substantial taught element should, normally, include the name of the discipline in the title'.

7. The professional doctorate was introduced in a number of universities in the late 1980s. According to a survey undertaken by the UK Council for Graduate Education, some 150 professional doctorate programmes are now in place across 50 universities. The same survey indicates that 80% of universities established before 1992 offer this type of provision in one or more fields. The titles of these degrees invariably indicate the subject of the profession at which they are aimed. Professional doctorates are particularly prevalent in the fields of engineering, education, and clinical psychology.

8. These programmes provide the opportunity for students to conduct research in a professional context and to develop advanced skills of particular relevance to a profession. They are intended also to reflect the needs of the profession concerned to incorporate research into the skills required by professional practitioners. In engineering, they are intended to equip young research engineers for a career in research management. The degrees are not primarily intended for those seeking a career in higher education. Nevertheless the central bodies believe, based on the experience of those staff in Cambridge who have been involved with Eng.D. programmes elsewhere, that Eng.D. programmes offered by institutions in Cambridge would represent a level of intellectual challenge comparable to the Ph.D. and that they would attract high-calibre applicants.

9. The Councils of the Schools of Physics and Chemistry and Technology support the introduction of the Eng.D., in order better to meet the needs of employers, to provide a more appropriate framework for doctoral provision in collaboration with companies, and so that they might be better able to grasp the opportunities offered by the EPSRC. The Eng.D. Degree is intended to provide a route for young engineers to enter the industry with a combination of a high level of technical expertise and well developed skills in problem solving, teamwork, and the design and implementation of research projects. The taught elements of the course, which include the development of management and technical skills as well as more general training in research, are formally assessed. On completion of the Eng.D. programme, students should have gained knowledge of areas relevant to the research project, of the role of research in an industrial context, of product development and of project management, teamwork, and communication skills. The Eng.D. Degree elsewhere is typically a four-year, full-time, programme, involving approximately 25% taught course-work and 75% research project work. The taught element equates, in volume and level, to a one-year Master's course. Students spend between 50% and 75% of their time working with collaborating companies on projects which meet each company's particular needs.

10. The EPSRC has invested considerable funds in supporting Eng.D. studentships at a number of approved 'Centres', each involving a particular university (or consortium of universities) and collaborating companies, and concerned with a theme within engineering. The purposes of the Centres are to facilitate company participation, to co-ordinate the selection of research projects and students, to provide the taught element within the programme, and to make appropriate supervision arrangements. Each student attracts a relatively generous funding package to support four years of fees, an enhanced level of stipend, travel, conference, and associated accommodation costs, and funds to ensure close supervisory contact.

11. Eng.D. programmes differ from the Ph.D. in a number of ways. Their taught elements, which normally occupy a greater amount of the student's time, are taught at an approved Eng.D. Centre (or at one of the universities participating in the Centre), are explicitly linked to particular professional skills, and are formally assessed. Research topics are of industrial significance and relate directly to issues encountered in professional practice. Students may undertake a single research project or a coherent portfolio of smaller, related, projects. The research is undertaken at both the university with which the student is registered and the collaborating organization. The balance of time spent at each varies according to the project. The representatives of the profession are significantly engaged, in collaboration with the university and the Centre concerned, in various aspects of the programme, including the selection of research topics, the provision of research facilities to supplement those of the university, and the joint supervision of students.

12. The Council and the General Board wish, however, to emphasize that, in several key respects, a Cambridge Eng.D. would be directly comparable to the full-time Ph.D. The programme would be taken on a full-time basis. College membership would be required (although it is recognized that, at least initially, not all Colleges may necessarily wish to admit Eng.D. students). Whilst the time each student spends in residence will vary, all students would be required to meet the same minimum residence requirements as apply to full-time Ph.D. students. It might not be easy to indicate in advance to Colleges the likely periods in which students will be in residence and thus might require accommodation. For this reason, it would be appropriate for University institutions wishing to accept Eng.D. students to make enquiries in advance as to which Colleges would be prepared to admit them. The University would be responsible for admissions through the same procedures as apply to other Graduate Students. Admission standards would be the same as those applied to prospective Ph.D. students. A student would only be admitted if the University institution, the Degree Committee concerned, and the Board of Graduate Studies were all satisfied that he or she was of sufficient calibre, that an appropriate supervisor could be identified, that the research facilities were adequate, and that the research topic was capable of being satisfactorily completed within four years. As with the arrangements for the Ph.D., no student would be registered for the Eng.D. Degree at the outset: each would undergo a registration assessment exercise, normally at the end of the first year, and might be required initially to register as a candidate for a Certificate of Postgraduate Study. Each student's progress would be monitored in the same way as applies to Ph.D. students. Each student's thesis would be expected to be equivalent to a Ph.D. dissertation in scope and quality and would need to demonstrate that the work represented a significant contribution to the particular field within which it fell. In addition, the student would be required to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the general field within which the work has been undertaken. As with the Ph.D., the degree would be awarded on the basis of a satisfactory outcome of an examination, including an oral examination, conducted by two Examiners appointed by the Degree Committee concerned. Arrangements for referral and re-examination would be similar to those for the Ph.D. Provision would be made for candidates who were either not successful in the examination for the Eng.D. Degree or not able to complete the full requirements for that degree to submit in candidature for the M.Sc. Degree. Each student's intellectual property rights would be determined in light of the final outcome of the recommendations made in the Second Joint Report of the Council and the General Board on the ownership of intellectual property rights.

13. The Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy currently contributes, with a number of universities (including the University of Oxford), to an existing EPSRC Eng.D. Centre which is concerned with engineering materials for high-performance applications in aerospace and related technologies. The EPSRC has recently agreed to invest very substantially in the Centre's future over the next decade. Whilst the Department contributes to the programme, the lack of an Eng.D. Degree at Cambridge requires students to register elsewhere. For the same reason, other institutions in Cambridge have not been in a position to participate in other Centres, nor to bid for the establishment of new Centres. There is strong support from the Council of the School of the Physical Sciences and from the Faculty Boards of Physics and Chemistry and of Engineering for the introduction of a framework which would allow their institutions, where they wish to do so, to take up the opportunities offered by such developments. The University of Oxford is introducing an Eng.D. Degree.

14. Under the arrangements for the Centre with which the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy is involved, students take sixteen taught modules, mainly, at present, at the University of Birmingham, where the Centre is based and at which Cambridge students are granted visiting student status to allow them access to the necessary facilities. The Department currently registers its prospective Ph.D. students for a Certificate of Postgraduate Study. Prospective Eng.D. students would be required successfully to complete similar requirements before registration for the degree. In the event that the proposals made in this Report are approved, a formal agreement with the universities providing the taught modules would be drawn up, to set out, inter alia, the respective responsibilities of the universities concerned in providing for the students, in terms, for example, of funding, teaching, progress, discipline, and health and safety.

15. As and when other institutions wish to participate in an Eng.D. programme, they would be required to present specific proposals to the Board of Graduate Studies and the central bodies within the framework described in this Report. They would need to demonstrate either their involvement in an approved EPSRC Centre or their capacity to provide an academic and funding infrastructure comparable to that in place in such Centres.

16. The Council and the General Board will look to the Board of Graduate Studies, in consultation with participating Degree Committees and institutions, to make the distinctive characteristics of the Eng.D. Degree clear in publicly available information and in the guidance given to students, supervisors, and examiners. They will also look to the Board to put in place appropriate quality assurance procedures which are consistent with those sections of the QAA's 'Code of Practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education' which are concerned with postgraduate research programmes and with collaborative provision.

17. The nature of graduate education, particularly research training, is changing considerably. The Council and the General Board and the Board of Graduate Studies believe that Cambridge must continue to be capable of responding to current and future changes.

18. Regulations proposed for the Eng.D. Degree are appended as the Annex to this Report. Consequent amendments to Statute B and to certain other regulations are also necessary and are set out in the recommendations.

19. The Council and the General Board accordingly recommend:

I. That, subject to the approval of Her Majesty in Council, the Statutes of the University be amended as set out below and that these amendments be submitted under the Common Seal of the University to Her Majesty in Council for approval:

Statute B

Chapter III

DEGREES

Section 1(c).

By adding before the words 'of Philosophy' the words 'of Engineering,'.

Section 3.

By adding before the words 'of Philosophy' the words 'of Engineering,'.

Section 5(a).

By inserting after the words 'degrees of Master of Letters or Science, or Doctor of Philosophy having followed a full-time course,' the words 'or to the degree of Doctor of Engineering,'.

Section 8(b).

By adding before the words 'of Philosophy' the words 'of Engineering,'.

II. That, if Recommendation I is approved, general regulations for the degree of Doctor of Engineering, as set out in the Annex to this Report, be approved with effect from 1 October following the date on which the amendments of Statutes contained in Recommendation I take effect.

III. That, if Recommendation II is approved, certain regulations be amended, with effect from the same date, as follows:

(a) The regulations for University Composition Fees (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 151):

Regulation 2.

By inserting into the list of examinations or qualifications 'Doctor of Engineering'.

Regulation 6.

By inserting the abbreviation 'Eng.D.' after the abbreviation Ph.D.

SCHEDULE

By inserting the following entry at the end of Schedule:

Eng.D. DegreeDDF

(b) The regulations for forms of presentation for degrees (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 175):

Regulation 1.

By amending the heading of the paragraph relating to Doctorates so as to read:

For the degree of Doctor of Engineering, Law, Letters, Medicine, Music, Philosophy, Science, or Veterinary Medicine

(c) The Schedule appended to the regulations for forms of presentation for degrees and forms of admission to degrees (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 177):

By adding at the end the following entry:

For the Eng.D. DegreeDoctoris in Ingeniaria

(d) The regulations for the order of seniority of graduates (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 177):

By inserting after the entry for Doctors of Philosophy the entry 'Doctors of Engineering'.

(e) The regulations for academical dress (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 178):

By inserting under the subtitle Black Gowns, after the entry relating to the Ph.D. Degree, the following entry:

Eng.D.: the Ph.D. gown;

By inserting under the subtitle Hoods, after the entry relating to the Ph.D. Degree, the following entry:

Eng.D.: of bronze silk lined with scarlet cloth;

By inserting under the subtitle Festal Gowns, after the entry relating to the Ph.D. Degree, the following entry:

Eng.D.: the Ph.D. gown.

(f) The general regulations for admission as a Graduate Student (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 399):

Regulation 5(b).

By adding at the end of the regulation the following words:

    or Eng.D. Degree, or to register as a candidate for the Ph.D. Degree a candidate previously registered for the Eng.D. Degree

Regulation 5(h).

By inserting after the words 'Ph.D. Degree,' the words 'or Eng.D. Degree,'

Regulation 6.

By inserting after the abbreviation 'Ph.D.,' the abbreviation 'Eng.D.,'.

Regulation 7.

By inserting in line 6 after the words 'under Regulation 2 of the regulations for the Ph.D., M.Sc., and M.Litt. Degrees,' the words 'or under Regulation 3 of the regulations for the Eng.D. Degree'.

Regulation 8.

By inserting a new Regulation 8(b) to read:

(b)a course of advanced study and research, as prescribed in the regulations for the Eng.D. Degree,
 or

and by renumbering current Regulations 8(b) and 8(c) as 8(c) and 8(d) respectively.

Regulation 11(a).

By inserting, in line 3, after the words 'of the regulations for the Ph.D., M.Sc., and M.Litt. Degrees,' the words 'or Regulation 2(a) of the regulations for the Eng.D. Degree,'.

Regulation 11(e).

By deleting from line 2 the word 'abroad'.

Regulation 14(b)(ii).

By inserting in line 3 after the words 'for the Ph.D., M.Sc., and M.Litt. Degrees,' the words 'or Regulation 2(a) of the regulations for the Eng.D. Degree,'.

(g) The regulations for the review of the results of examinations for postgraduate qualifications (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 403).

By adding to the Schedule appended to the regulations:

Eng.D. Degree

(h) The general regulations for Certificates of Postgraduate Study (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 527):

Regulation 1.

By inserting in line 6 after the abbreviation 'Ph.D.' the abbreviation 'Eng.D.'.

Regulation 5.

By amending the regulation so as to read:

5. Each candidate shall be required to submit a dissertation, unless otherwise prescribed in the Special Regulations for the subject for which he or she is registered, and to undertake an oral examination and to undergo such other forms of examination as are prescribed in the Special Regulations for that subject.

Regulation 11.

By inserting the abbreviation 'Eng.D.' after the abbreviation 'Ph.D.' at each occurrence.

24 January 2005ALISON RICHARD, Vice-ChancellorMIKE CLARKJAMES MATHESON
 R. J. ANDERSONGEMMA DONALDSONMARTIN REES
 A. J. BADGERBOB DOWLINGDAVID SIMON
 Z. BARANSKIRUTH KEELINGWES STREETING
 RICHARD BARNESDAVID S. INGRAMLIBA TAUB
 NIGEL BROWND. LOWTHERJOAN M. WHITEHEAD
 WILLIAM BROWND. W. B. MACDONALDRICHARD WILSON

8 December 2004ALISON RICHARD, Vice-ChancellorRICHARD FRIENDROGER PARKER
 JOHN BELLDREW LIVINGSTONKEITH PETERS
 WILLIAM BROWND. W. B. MACDONALDBOLIVAR VILLACIS
 N. O. A. BULLOCKMELVEENA MCKENDRICKS. J. YOUNG
 H. A. CHASE  

ANNEX

Doctor of Engineering

1. In order to qualify for the degree of Doctor of Engineering a candidate shall be required satisfactorily to complete a course of training prescribed for that degree and provide evidence of a significant original contribution to study in the field of engineering.

2. Subject to clauses (a)-(c) below, a Graduate Student registered for the Degree of Doctor of Engineering (Eng.D.) shall pursue in the University, and such other places as the Board and the Degree Committee concerned shall determine, a course of training and research under supervision for not less than twelve terms.

The number of terms shall begin with the term from which the student is registered as a candidate for the degree and shall be consecutive except in so far as the student may have been allowed to intermit his or her course under clause (b) below, or except in so far as the Board may have determined that he or she shall not be allowed to count any particular term towards the requirements for the degree.

(a)The Board, after considering a recommendation by the Degree Committee concerned, may allow a Graduate Student to spend all but three terms of his or her course as a candidate for a degree, or any lesser number of terms, working under supervision outside the University under conditions approved by the Degree Committee and the Board.
(b)On account of illness or other sufficient cause, the Board, after considering a recommendation by the Degree Committee concerned, may allow a Graduate Student to intermit his or her course of research for one or more terms. Such terms shall not count for any purpose of these regulations except as provided in Regulation 7 of the general regulations for admission as a Graduate Student.
(c)A student who is qualified to receive, but who has not received, a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in a subject intended as preparation for the Eng.D. Degree may be allowed to count not more than three terms of the period during which he or she was a candidate for the Certificate concerned towards the Degree.

Every application for a dispensation under clauses (a)-(c) shall be made in writing to the Secretary of the Board, and shall be accompanied by a written opinion from the applicant's Supervisor.

3. On the recommendation of the Board, the Council may grant to a Graduate Student in respect of work done in the University before matriculation, if the student's matriculation was delayed for sufficient cause, an allowance of terms not exceeding three in number, towards the minimum of three terms required to be kept under Statute B, III, 5(a) for full-time study leading to the Eng.D. Degree.

4. The Board may grant to a Graduate Student, after considering an application supported by the student's Tutor, one or two terms of research towards satisfying the requirements of Regulation 2, on account of illness or other grave cause. For every term so allowed the student shall pay the appropriate fee as prescribed in Regulation 11 of the general regulations for admission as a Graduate Student.

5. In order to be registered as a candidate for the Degree, a Graduate Student must have completed, to the satisfaction of the Board and the Degree Committee concerned, such course-work, undertaken either in the University or at such other place as may have been approved for this purpose, as the Board and Degree Committee may have specified.

6. The course of training and research shall be conducted under such supervisory arrangements as the Board and the Degree Committee concerned shall specify. The Board and the Degree Committee shall satisfy themselves that, during the periods when a student is working outside the University, appropriate arrangements for supervision and for reporting on the student's progress are in place.

7. The examination for the degree of Eng.D. shall consist

(a)such course-work as the Board and the Degree Committee concerned shall specify;
(b)the submission of a dissertation embodying the results of the candidate's approved course of research, which shall be submitted in accordance with the provisions of Regulations 8-9; in place of a dissertation, a candidate may, by special permission of the Board and the Degree Committee concerned, submit a portfolio of work of equivalent length;
(c)an examination, conducted orally, on the subject of the dissertation, and the general field of knowledge within which it falls, provided that in exceptional circumstances, and on the recommendation of the Degree Committee concerned, the Board may dispense with such an examination.

8. A candidate may submit his or her dissertation not earlier than the first day of the term during which he or she expects to complete the requirements of Regulation 2 and not later than the last day of the vacation following the twelfth term after that in which the student was registered as a candidate for the degree, provided that, with the permission of the Board, a dissertation may be submitted later than that day. An allowance of terms made by the Council under Regulation 3 shall count in calculating the standing of a student for the purpose of this regulation.

9. In submitting their dissertations, candidates shall state, generally in a preface and specifically in notes or in a bibliography, the sources from which their information is derived, the extent to which they have availed themselves of the work of others, and the portions of the dissertation which are claimed as original. They shall also be required to declare that the dissertation submitted is not substantially the same as any that they may have submitted for a degree or diploma or similar qualification. The work, apart from quotations, shall be written in English. Each Degree Committee shall have power to specify a maximum length for dissertations submitted by students working under its supervision. Candidates will also submit a statement by those responsible for their supervision certifying the conditions under which each candidate's work was undertaken.

10. Two copies of each candidate's dissertation, accompanied by the statement referred to in Regulation 9 and three copies of a summary of about 300 words in length, shall be sent to the Secretary of the Board, who shall forward the copies and two copies of the summary to the Secretary of the Degree Committee concerned. In special circumstances the Board, after consulting the Degree Committee, may allow a candidate to submit one copy only of the dissertation. The dissertation shall be referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee. Neither of the Examiners shall have been the candidate's Supervisor. Each Examiner shall make an independent report on it to the Degree Committee. The two Examiners shall jointly conduct the oral examination specified in Regulation 6(c), and shall sign a joint certificate of the result. If the Examiners do not agree in their recommendations or if for any other reason the Degree Committee or the Board need a further opinion or opinions on the merit of the work submitted, the Degree Committee may appoint an additional Examiner or additional Examiners, provided that not more than one additional Examiner shall be appointed without leave of the Board. Each additional Examiner so appointed shall make an independent report on the dissertation to the Degree Committee.

11. If a candidate fails to satisfy the Examiners in the oral examination specified in Regulation 6(c), the Degree Committee may permit the candidate to be re-examined by the same Examiners. Permission so given shall be communicated to the Secretary of the Board and shall not be given on more than one occasion. Each Examiner who takes part in an examination under this regulation shall be paid a fee of £38 in addition to any fees to which he or she may be entitled under Regulation 12, and may also claim travelling expenses in accordance with the provisions of that regulation.

12. Each Examiner shall receive a fee from the Chest. Such a fee shall be £120 if the Examiner takes part in the oral examination specified in Regulation 6(c), or £88 if the Examiner does not so take part, either because the Board, on the recommendation of the Degree Committee, have dispensed with the oral examination or for any other reason. Examiners may claim travelling expenses, on terms and conditions specified by the Board if their place of residence is more than ten miles from Great St Mary's Church or if an oral examination or a consultation between the Examiners is for good reason held outside Cambridge. The Board may also approve payment of other reasonable expenses incurred by an Examiner in connection with the execution of his or her duties. A subsistence allowance may be claimed by Examiners at rates determined from time to time by the Finance Committee of the Council, provided that payment may be made only in respect of a day or a night on which the Examiner's absence from his or her normal place of residence in connection with the execution of his or her duties is necessary. The travelling expenses of a candidate who is required to travel to an oral examination outside Cambridge may be paid in whole or in part, at rates determined by the Board; such a candidate may also claim a subsistence allowance at rates determined from time to time by the Finance Committee, under the same conditions as apply to the Examiners.

13. If, after considering the reports of the Examiners on the examinations specified in Regulation 7, the Degree Committee are satisfied that the student's work is of the requisite standard for the degree, a recommendation of the Committee to that effect, with the names of those present and voting on either side, shall be communicated to the Board, together with the reports of the Examiners. If the Board, after receiving such communication, at a meeting at which not less than five members are present, resolve that the candidate be approved for the Eng.D. Degree, the Secretary of the Board shall publish a notice of the candidate's approval for the award of the Degree.

14. If, after considering the reports of the Examiners, the Degree Committee consider that a student's dissertation is not of the requisite standard for the degree, the Board may, at a meeting at which no less than five members are present, permit the student to submit a revised dissertation, but they shall not do so unless the Degree Committee have expressly recommended that such permission be given. The communication conveying such a recommendation by a Degree Committee shall contain the names of those present and voting on either side, and shall be accompanied by the reports of the Examiners. A student shall not be allowed to submit a revised dissertation on more than one occasion.

15. If, after considering the reports of the Examiners, the Degree Committee consider that a student's work is not of the standard requisite for the Eng.D. Degree, but that it is of the standard requisite for the M.Sc. Degree, their recommendation to that effect, with the names of those present and voting on either side, shall be communicated to the Board, together with the reports of the Examiners. If after receiving such communication the Board decide, at a meeting at which not less than five members are present, that the candidate could properly be approved for the award of the lower degree, the Secretary of the Board shall ask the candidate whether he or she is willing to be approved for the award of the M.Sc. Degree. Subject to the candidate's agreement being received by the Secretary not later than the last day of the term following the term or vacation in which the decision on his or her candidature was made, the Board shall approve the candidate for the award of that degree and the Secretary shall publish a notice of such approval. The Board may, in exceptional circumstances, which they shall themselves determine, accept a candidate's agreement at a later date.

16. The Board shall be the deciding authority on all recommendations communicated to them by Degree Committees that candidates be approved for the award of the Eng.D. or M.Sc. Degree or that they be allowed to submit revised dissertations. The Board shall not approve a candidate for the award of a degree unless the Degree Committee have recommended the award of that degree; before refusing an award so recommended they shall give a representative appointed by the Degree Committee an opportunity of explaining the Committee's reasons for their recommendation.

17. If after considering the reports of the Examiners the Degree Committee resolve that a candidate's work is not of the requisite standard for any degree, and if they do not recommend that the candidate be allowed to submit a revised dissertation, their resolution to that effect, with the names of those present and voting on either side, shall be communicated to the Board, together with the reports of the Examiners. The Secretary of the Board shall communicate this decision to the candidate.

18. Before being admitted to a degree, a student shall deposit with the Secretary of the Board one copy of his or her dissertation and two copies of the summary, in a form approved by the Board. The Secretary shall deposit the copy of the dissertation together with one copy of the summary in the University Library, where they shall be available for consultation and for the making of copies for inter-library loan purposes, unless the Board determine that they shall, for a period specified by the Board, be available only to the author or to those who have the author's written permission to consult the material. The summary shall be available for copying and publication at the discretion of the Board.


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Cambridge University Reporter 26 January 2005
Copyright © 2005 The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.