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FORM AND CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS, 2004-05: NOTICE

Notices by Faculty Boards, or other bodies concerned, of changes to the form and conduct of certain examinations to be held in 2004-05, by comparison with those examinations in 2004, are published below. Complete details of the form and conduct of all examinations are available from the Faculties or Departments concerned.

Education Studies Tripos, Part II

The Faculty Board of Education give notice that, with effect from the examinations to be held in 2005, the form of the examination for the Education Studies Tripos will be changed as follows:

Section II, Paper 5. A special subject in education studies: the whole curriculum of the primary and middle years

The sections of the paper are re-ordered as follows:

1The whole curriculum of the primary and middle years
2Values education and personal responsibility
3Pastoral issues and personal responsibility
4School and community - working with parents and other professionals
5School governance and equal opportunity issues

There are no changes to the number of questions or the rubric for the examination paper.

Section III, Paper 6(a). Children and literature

The paper will consist of three Sections. Sections A, B, and C.

Section A will be a compulsory practical criticism section requiring candidates to analyse unseen passages and will require candidates to analyse one passage from a selection.

Section B will require candidates to answer one out of three questions relating to prescribed texts.

Section C will require candidates to answer one question from a selection.

Students will be provided with a Specimen Examination paper in the new format.

Natural Sciences Tripos

The Committee of Management for the Natural Sciences Tripos give notice that, with effect from the examinations to be held in 2005, the form and the conduct of the examinations for the Natural Sciences Tripos will be changed as follows:

PART Ib

Advanced Physics

Paper 2A will now be divided into four sections. Section A, as a whole, has the same weight as each question in Sections B, C, and D. Section A will contain six short questions on Statistical Physics and Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, of which candidates must attempt five; Section B will contain two questions on Statistical Physics, of which candidates must attempt one; Section C will contain two essay or brief notes questions on Statistical Physics, of which candidates must attempt one; Section D will contain four questions on Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, of which candidates must attempt two.

Paper 2B will now be divided into four sections. Section A, as a whole, has the same weight as each question in Sections B, C, and D. Section A will contain six short questions on Statistical Physics and Methods of Mathematical Physics, of which candidates must attempt five; Section B will contain two questions on statistical physics, of which candidates must attempt one; Section C will contain two essay or brief notes questions on Statistical Physics, of which candidates must attempt one; Section D will contain four questions on Methods of Mathematical Physics, of which candidates must attempt two.

The format of Paper 1 remains unchanged.

Experimental Psychology

The examination will consist of two three-hour written papers, a written practical of an hour and a half, and the submission of practical reports.

In each of the written papers (Papers 1 and 2), candidates will be required to attempt six questions. Section A will contain four questions, of which candidates must attempt two. In each of the Sections B-E, each Section will contain two or more questions, of which candidates must attempt one. The sections will cover the following topics:

Section A - Human experimental psychology (perception, memory, cognition);
Section B - Psychophysiology;
Section C - Developmental psychology;
Section D - Social psychology;
Section E - Individual differences and abnormal psychology.

Each written paper will carry the same mark and count 40% towards the total mark for the subject.

The written practical paper (Paper 3) will be divided into two sections, A and B. In Section A, candidates will be required to attempt a compulsory statistics question requiring the analysis of data. Section B will contain three questions on experimental design, of which candidates must attempt one. Paper 3 will count 20% towards the total mark for the subject.

Candidates will also be assessed in relation to five specified practical classes. For four of these, candidates will be required to submit written accounts of the practical class. For the remaining one, assessment will take the form of a 'quiz' held during the practical class or immediately following the class. Each report or quiz result will be judged to be either 'satisfactory' or 'unsatisfactory'. For each practical report either not received or judged to be unsatisfactory, 1.5 percentage marks will be subtracted from the total marks gained in the written papers.

Pharmacology

The examination will consist of two written papers, a practical paper, and the submission of a notebook containing a record of practical work.

Both written papers will examine all aspects of the course. Paper 1 will last for one hour and carry 25% of the total marks for the subject; candidates will be required to attempt ten compulsory questions requiring short answers in the form of notes and diagrams. All questions will carry equal marks.

The formats of Paper 2, the written practical paper and the submission of notebooks to be examined remain unchanged.

PART II (GENERAL)

Physics

The examination will consist of the submission of further work, as outlined in the Physics Course Handbook, and written papers taken from the Part II Experimental and Theoretical Physics course. Candidates will be required to take Paper 2 and one section from either Paper 3 or Paper 4.

PART II

Anatomy (Option B)

In Paper 4, candidates will be provided with one research paper for critical review.

The formats of all other papers remain unchanged.

Biochemistry

Paper 3 will now last for three hours; Paper 4 will now last for three hours, with an additional fifteen minutes of reading time.

The formats of the other papers remain unchanged.

Experimental and Theoretical Physics

The examination will consist of the submission of further work, as outlined in the Physics Course Handbook, and four written papers, one of two hours' duration and three of three hours' duration.

Candidates offering Option A shall offer Papers 1 and 2 and any two Sections from Papers 3 and/or 4. Candidates offering Option B shall offer Papers 1 and 2 and any three or four Sections from Papers 3 and 4. The number of Sections offered in Papers 3 and/or 4 will depend on the amount of further work submitted.

Paper 1 shall be of three hours' duration and consist of four Sections. Section A shall contain three short questions on Thermal and Statistical Physics and three short questions on Relativity, Electrodynamics, and Light: candidates must attempt all questions. Section B shall contain one essay or brief notes question on Thermal and Statistical Physics and one essay or brief notes question on Relativity, Electrodynamics, and Light: candidates must attempt both questions. Section C shall contain two questions on Thermal and Statistical Physics of which candidates must attempt one. Section D shall contain two questions on Relativity, Electrodynamics, and Light of which candidates must attempt one. All Sections have approximately the same weight.

Paper 2 shall be of two hours' duration and shall consist of two Sections. Section A shall contain four short questions on Advanced Quantum Physics: candidates must attempt all questions. Section B shall contain three questions on Advanced Quantum Physics of which one will be essay or brief notes style: candidates must attempt two questions. Section A has approximately one quarter of the total weight.

Paper 3 shall be of three hours' duration and shall consist of two Sections. Section A shall contain three questions on Particle and Nuclear Physics of which one will be essay or brief notes style: candidates must attempt two questions. Section B shall consist of three questions on Astrophysics of which one will be essay or brief notes style: candidates must attempt two questions. All questions have the same weight.

Paper 4 shall be of three hours' duration and shall consist of two Sections. Section A shall contain three questions on Soft Condensed Matter and Biophysics of which one will be essay or brief notes style: candidates must attempt two questions. Section B shall contain three questions on Quantum Condensed Matter Physics of which one will be essay or brief notes style: candidates must attempt two questions. All questions have the same weight.

Genetics

The written examination will consist of six compulsory written papers, the submission of an extended essay and a report of a research investigation.

Papers 1 to 5 will contain eight or nine essay questions, of which candidates must attempt three. Each paper will carry equal weight.

Paper 6 will be divided into two sections. Section 1 (Problem solving) will contain three problems, of which candidates must attempt two. The questions may come from any area covered in the Part II course, not necessarily only those covered in the problem sessions. Section 2 (Journal criticism) will require candidates to write a critical account of a short paper from the primary literature.

The written papers will account for 75% of the total marks, with the extended essay and report accounting for the remaining 25%.

Details of the mark distribution between the separate components of the exam are contained in the course guide, and are on the Departmental website. Copies of specimen papers showing the outline of the written papers and the type of questions to be asked are available on the website at http://www.gen.cam.ac.uk/.

History and Philosophy of Science

There shall be ten papers, of which students are required to offer three. Each paper will be divided into two sections, Section A and Section B: candidates will be required to answer questions from both sections of each paper.

In each paper, Section A will consist of general questions that range over the Paper; candidates will be required to answer one question chosen from a possible three in this section. Section B will consist of more specific questions; candidates will be required to answer three questions chosen from a possible nine. Each question will carry the same weight.

Zoology

The general essay paper shall now last only two hours. The examination weighting applied to the individual elements will now be as follows:

(a)four 3-hour written papers62% in total
(b)a 2,000 word critical essay8%
(c)practical project25%
(d)2-hour general essay paper5%

The formats of the other papers remain unchanged.

Oriental Studies Tripos

The Faculty Board of Oriental Studies give notice that, further to the notice published in the 1 December edition of the Reporter (p. 238), with effect from the examination to be held in 2005, the form of the examinations for the Oriental Studies Tripos will be changed as follows:

OS. 1. Cinema East: an introduction to the film traditions of Asia and the Middle East

The examination paper will consist of approximately 20 questions out of which candidates will be required to answer three. Candidates will have to show knowledge of films from at least two of the language areas represented, and some familiarity with general themes in cinema method and theory.

Theological and Religious Studies Tripos

The Faculty Board of Divinity give notice that, with effect from the examination to be held in 2005, the form of the examinations for the Theological and Religious Studies Tripos will be changed as follows:

Paper C6. Late patristic and medieval theology

The form of examination for this paper will be a three-hour written paper, divided into four sections. Section A will deal with late patristic authors; Section B will deal with high medieval Western authors; Section C will deal with fourteenth-century authors; and Section D will deal with comparative or synthetic issues. Each section will contain at least four questions. Candidates will be required to answer a total of four questions, including at least one from Sections A, B, and D, and to show sustained engagement with at least four set texts.

Paper C11. Metaphysics

The examination for this paper will consist of a three-hour written paper. Sixteen questions will be set, of which candidates must attempt three.

Examination in Finance for the degree of Master of Philosophy

The Degree Committee for the Judge Institute of Management give notice that in the academical year 2004-05 the subjects for examination in Finance for the M.Phil. Degree will be as listed below. The method of examination is shown for each subject.

Group 1 (compulsory subjects)

(1)Either 
 S300Econometrics (three-hour written examination and a project)
 or
 S301Quantitative methods in economics and finance (three-hour written examination and a project)
(2)MP2 Principles of finance (three-hour written examination)

One of the following shall be taken as a Group 1 subject. The remaining subjects may be selected as Group 2 (optional papers).

S403Theory of finance (three-hour written examination)
MP14Topics in empirical finance (assessed by course-work)
MP3Financial reporting and capital markets (assessed by course-work)

Group 2 (optional papers)

S402Microeconomics for finance (two-hour examination plus optional two-hour mid-course paper)
MF1Introduction to financial reporting (assessed by course-work)
MP13Globalization and the impact of global big business (assessed by course-work)
TP5Distribution networks (assessed by course-work)
TP6Risk management and real options (assessed by course-work)
MP5Environment and sustainability (assessed by course-work)
MP8Topics in marketing and strategy (assessed by course-work)

Papers from Part III of the Mathematical Tripos:

Mathematical models in financial management (one two-hour written examination)
Advanced financial models (one three-hour written examination)
Advanced probability (one three-hour written examination)
Actuarial statistics (one two-hour written examination)
Stochastic calculus and applications (one three-hour written examination)
Time series and Monte Carlo inference (one three-hour written examination)
Large deviations and queues (one two-hour written examination)
Numerical solution of differential equations (one three-hour written examination)

Examination in Financial Research for the degree of Master of Philosophy

The Degree Committee for the Judge Institute of Management give notice that in the academical year 2004-05 the subjects for examination in Financial Research for the M.Phil. Degree will be as listed below. The method of examination is shown for each subject.

Group 1 (compulsory subjects)

(1)Either 
 S300Econometrics (three-hour written examination and a project)
 or
 S301Quantitative methods in economics and finance (three-hour written examination and a project)
(2)MP2Principles of finance (three-hour written examination)
(3)MP0-2 Qualitative Research Methods (assessed by course-work)

Group 2 (optional papers)

S402Microeconomics for finance (two-hour examination)
S403Theory of finance (three-hour written examination)
MP14Topics in empirical finance (assessed by course-work)
MP3Financial reporting and capital markets (assessed by course-work)
MF1Introduction to financial reporting (assessed by course-work)

Papers from Part III of the Mathematical Tripos:

Mathematical models in financial management (one two-hour written examination)
Advanced financial models (one three-hour written examination)
Advanced probability (one three-hour written examination)
Actuarial statistics (one two-hour written examination)
Stochastic calculus and applications (one three-hour written examination)
Time series and Monte Carlo inference (one three-hour written examination)
Large deviations and queues (one two-hour written examination)
Numerical solution of differential equations (one three-hour written examination)


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Cambridge University Reporter 8 December 2004
Copyright © 2004 The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.