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Institute of Continuing Education: Notice

INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOLS 2006: PLENARY LECTURE SERIES

In 2006 the International Division of the Institute of Continuing Education celebrates its eighty-third year of arranging International Summer Schools. Some 900 visitors will come to the University for periods of study lasting from ten days to six weeks. At the core of each Summer School are small special study classes, usually taught by members of the University. Each programme also offers plenary lectures for all participants in that Summer School, and experts from within the University and beyond are invited to contribute to these series.

These lectures have been very well received in the past, and the organizers of the Summer Schools would like, where possible, to make them more widely accessible to those with research and teaching interests in the subject concerned. The lectures are not open to the public, but where space in the lecture hall or venue permits, we are willing to make places available for members of the University to attend the plenary lectures which interest them most.

Please note: members of the University may be asked to confirm their status to one of the Institute's staff in attendance at the lecture hall. We would be grateful if those wishing to attend any of these lectures would notify us in advance. Contact details are given at the end of this list. Any unavoidable changes to the list of venues or speakers will be posted in the main Summer Schools Office (Foyer, Lady Mitchell Hall, for all except the Science Summer Schools): we suggest you arrive a few minutes in advance in order to allow time to check the location.

International Summer School: Plenary Lecture Series

The first term of the Institute of Continuing Education's eighty-third International Summer School will take place from Monday, 10 July to Friday, 4 August 2006. The talks in this series of lectures follow the theme of Secrets and lies. The topics have been chosen to stimulate interest amongst a group of students whose own interests are necessarily very diverse. Topics range widely: from the secret lives of plants and insects, energy, and eyewitness testimony to spies, news reporting, fraud and forgery, and the secrets of health and happiness. Lectures take place on weekday mornings, in the Lady Mitchell Hall. They begin promptly at 10.30 a.m., and finish at 11.30 a.m. The series is arranged for the c. 250 participants on the International Summer School, but members of the University are cordially invited to attend.

12 July Persuasion on the dark side, by Stephen Jolly
13 July Secrets and lies: perceptions of government, by Lord Wilson of Dinton
14 July Right of silence, by Dr Roderick Munday
17 July Hearing is believing, by Professor Peter Lipton
18 July Tell the Truth - The whole truth, nothing, or lies in the service of truth, by Kate Adie
19 July Children's eyewitness memory: sex, lies, and videotapes, by Professor Graham Davies
20 July Democracies do not negotiate with terrorists - or do they?, by John Jackson
24 July The truth about the 1930s, by Dr Piers Brendon
25 July Justifying crime, by Richard Ellis
26 July The faker's progress, by John Myatt
27 July The deceptive ape: the role of deception in defining human beings, by Dr John Lawson
28 July Energy: secrets and lies, by Professor Colin Humphreys
31 July Evolution: its best kept secrets, by Professor Simon Conway-Morris
1 August The secret life of the cancer cell, by Professor Ron Laskey

Evening lectures, also in the Lady Mitchell Hall, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. (see also Joint Evening Lectures, arranged for the benefit of more than one Summer School, below):

17 July Ladybird secrets and lies, by Dr Michael Majerus
18 July Winston Churchill: secrets and lies, by Dr Mark Goldie
26 July Secrets and lies about life in the 'miserable' Middle Ages, by Bill Zajac
27 July Secrets of the site of Mount Sinai, by Professor Colin Humphreys
31 July Conmen, fraudsters, and spin-doctors, by Rob Eastaway

Summer School in Art History: Plenary Lecture Series

The Summer School in Art History will take place from Sunday, 9 July to Saturday, 29 July 2006. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is Sources of modern masters. Morning lectures take place in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, on the Sidgwick Site at the times given below.

10 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The use of sources by modern masters: an introduction, by Nicholas Friend
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Colour sources, artists' materials, by Dr Spike Bucklow
11 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Degas and Raphael, by Jo Rhymer
12 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Sources of modernist architecture, by Dr Alan Powers
13 July 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.Nineteenth-century drawing techniques, by Clarissa Koch
14 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.'A power supreme': Turner's romance with the sea, by Dr James Hamilton
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Turner's sources, by Dr James Hamilton
17 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The Ash Can School and Dutch social realism, by Nicholas Friend
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.The influence of Japan on the Scottish School, by William Hardie
18 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Matisse and Rothko: decoration and abstraction, by Professor Charles Harrison
19 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The cult of the wild beast: its sources, affinities, and aftermath, by Dr Nicholas Watkins
21 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Sources of a modern mistress: Paula Rego, by Elizabeth McKellar
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Going Places: traditional and modern sources in the art of John Piper, by Dr Frances Spalding
24 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Moore and Mexico, by Nicholas Friend
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.The language of Classicism in the era of Modernism, by Professor David Watkin
25 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Van Gogh and his sources, by Clare Ford-Wille
26 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Lichtenstein, Warhol, and their sources, by James Malpas
27 July 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.Icon painting in the twenty-first century: a personal story, by Aidan Hart
28 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Sources of modern design, by Professor Jonathan Woodham
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Influences on abstract art, by Nicholas Friend

Additional lectures given in the evening in Wolfson Court, Clarkson Road, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint Evening Lectures, below):

10 July A revolution in English houses: A. W. N. Pugin and the early Gothic revival, by Timothy Brittain-Caitlin
17 July Redressing the past: Revivals, romanticism, and modernity in contemporary fashion, by Susan North
18 July Space within form: the condition for image and emotion, by Oliver Gosling
19 July Historical sources for the calligrapher - a necessity for modern form, by Paul Antonio Attong
24 July The kindest cut of all, by Lida Cardozo Kindersley
26 July Fakes as art, by John Myatt

Literature Summer School, Shakespeare to the Present Day: Plenary Lecture Series

The Literature Summer School will take place from Sunday, 9 July to Saturday, 29 July 2006. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is Tragedy or comedy? Morning lectures take place in the Lecture Block, Room 3, on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 11.15 a.m., and end at 12.15 p.m.

10 July Heroes? Call those heroes?: Shakespeare's problem with tragedy, by Dr Fred Parker
11 July Shakespeare and the Gothic imagination, by Dr Catherine Alexander
12 July Articulating the agony and the ecstasy, by Dr Sarah Houghton-Walker
13 July Tragicomedy: both or neither?, by Dr Raphael Lyne
14 July Comic bodies, tragic bodies, by Dr David Hillman
17 July The tragic comedians: tragedy, comedy, and the novel, by Dr Anne Henry
18 July The comedy and tragedy of love 2: the end of the affair, by Professor Laurence Lerner
20 July Tragical mirth, by Dr Charles Moseley
21 July Tragedy, comedy, and theory, by Dr Katie Fleming
24 July Shakespeare and the avoidance of tragedy, by Clive Wilmer
25 July Dark comedy, by Dr Michael Hurley
26 July Tragic or comic feeling? Ambivalence in the literature of sensibility, by Dr Ildiko Csengei
27 July Dickens and Shakespeare's ghost, by Professor Adrian Poole
28 July Wordsworth's faith, by Dr Stephen Logan

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Lecture Block, Room 3, on the Sidgwick Site, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint Evening Lectures, below):

17 July The comedy and tragedy of love 1: Shakespeare and love's disguises, by Professor Laurence Lerner
18 July Humour and the avant-garde, by Dr Eric White
19 July 'Into something rich and strange': Shakespearean tragicomedy, by Dr Subha Mukherji
24 July Tragedy and the suffering of animals, by Dr Christopher Burlinson
26 July Poetry reading, by Clive Wilmer

Science Summer School: Plenary Lecture Series

The Science Summer School will take place from Sunday, 16 July to Saturday, 5 August 2006. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is Innovation and global change. Lectures take place in the Trust Room, Fitzwilliam College at the times given below.

17 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.20 a.m.Introductory talk, by Sir David King (title to be advised)
18 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Exploring the solar system, by Dr Carolin Crawford
19 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The master puppeteer - how the brain controls the body, by Professor Daniel Wolpert
20 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Environmental monitoring of GM crops, by Dr Les Firbank
21 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Stem cell biology - coming of age, by Professor Austin Smith
24 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.How the embryo builds itself - revelations from conjoined twins and salamanders, by Dr Miranda Gomperts
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.The Bangladesh arsenic crisis and its global implications, by Professor John McArthur
25 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Computer vision and computer graphics: the mathematics behind the movies, by Dr Joan Lasenby
26 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Volcanoes and climate, by Dr Tamsin Mather
27 July 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.The evolution of intelligence, by Professor Simon Conway-Morris
  10.30 a.m. - 11.30 p.m.Cyborg science: combining human and machine brains, by Professor Kevin Warwick
28 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Flood risk and flood management in a changing environment, by Dr James Brasington
31 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Type 2 diabetes: from molecule to malady, by Professor Frances Ashcroft
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.Publishing scientific research in the 24 hour-news society, by Tracey Brown
1 August 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The anatomy of unconsciousness - where anaesthetics work in the brain, by Dr David Menon
2 August 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Mountains, tsunamis, and global change - the perils of living on plate margins, by Professor Nigel Harris
3 August 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Pain and pain perception, by Irene Tracey
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.Innovation in aircraft noise reduction, by Dr William Graham
4 August 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Harmonics and the physics of music, by Dr Hugh Hunt
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.The global challenge of cancer, by Professor Ron Laskey

Additional lectures given in the evening may also be of interest (see also Joint Evening Lectures, below):

17 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Quantum technologies and communication and computation, by Professor Sir Michael Pepper
18 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Energy and the limits to innovation, by Professor David Elliott
26 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Engineering the World Trade Center: how did it collapse and why did it stand up so long?, by Dr Chris Burgoyne
27 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Innovation in science, by Professor Peter Lipton
1 August 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.The role of autism in shaping society, by Dr John Lawson
2 August 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Obesity: science vs stigma, by Professor Steve O'Rahilly

History Summer School, Medieval to Modern: Plenary Lecture Series

The Summer School in History will take place from Sunday, 30 July to Saturday, 19 August 2006. The theme for this year's morning plenary lecture series is Power and leadership. Morning lectures take place in the Little Hall on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 9.15 a.m. and end at 10.30 a.m.

31 July Ancient Athens: democracy without leaders?, by Dr Paul Millett
1 August Leadership, or the absence of it, on the Fourth Crusade, 1202-1204, by Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith
2 August The power of the Press: the role of the printed word in the English Reformation, by Dr Elizabeth Evenden
3 August Churchill: image and reality, by Dr Richard Toye
4 August Crown and nobility in late medieval England, by Professor Christine Carpenter
7 August Napoleon as charismatic hero, by Professor Tim Blanning
8 August Monarchs and Parliaments 1603-1688: who ruled Britain?, by Professor John S. Morrill
10 August Power in a slave society: the American South, by Dr Betty Wood
11 August Power and leadership in the East Asian International order, by Dr Shogo Suzuki
14 August Pope Joan, by Dr Tom Freeman
15 August Parliament and the monarchy, 1688-1783: who ruled Britain?, by Dr Andrew Thompson
16 August Charles de Gaulle: a Republican Bonapartist, by Dr Aidan Van De Weyer
17 August Secret intelligence, power, and leadership, by Professor Christopher Andrew
18 August The Three Edwards: good kings and bad kings in medieval England, by Dr Rosemary Horrox

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Little Hall from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. may also be of interest (see also Joint Evening Lectures, below):

31 July Oliver Cromwell: power and leadership in the British Republic, by Dr David Smith
2 August George Bush and US foreign policy, by Professor Jonathan Steinberg
3 August The Victorian monarchy, masculinity and feminism?, by Clarissa Campbell Orr
10 August The histories of medieval Iceland: fact and fiction, by Professor Andrew Orchard

International Summer Schools: Joint Evening Lecture Series

A number of lectures have been arranged for the benefit of more than one Summer School. These take place on the Sidgwick Site usually, but not always in the Lady Mitchell Hall, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.:

13 July Secrets of wonderful lives, by Dr Nick Baylis
14 July An introduction to Julius Caesar, by Dr Fred Parker
19 July Lies and subterfuge: the deceptive world of plants, by Professor John Parker
21 July An introduction to Romeo and Juliet, by Simon Browne
24 July The Enigma cipher machine, by Claire Ellis
1 August The Da Vinci conspiracy, by Dr Richard Rex
7 August The lessons of the British Empire?, by Sean Lang
9 August Whither the European Constitution?, by Dr Julie E. Smith
11 August An introduction to Antony and Cleopatra, by Simon Browne
14 August Foundering and floundering - the hazards of travel in the Middle Ages, by Dr Rowena E. Archer
15 August Art under the dictators - the Soviet Union and the Third Reich, by Dr Don Watts

Please note:

Any unforeseen or last-minute changes to this lecture programme will be posted in the main Summer Schools Office (Lady Mitchell Hall) or, for the Science programme, in Fitzwilliam College.

Your response to these lectures is invited

We would be interested to hear your response to any of the plenary lectures you have heard. If you have comments, or wish to know more about teaching on the Summer Schools, please write to Sarah Ormrod, Director of International Programmes, Institute of Continuing Education, Madingley Hall, Madingley (tel. 140-216, e-mail sjo1001@cam.ac.uk).


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Cambridge University Reporter 21 June 2006
Copyright © 2006 The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.