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Institute of Continuing Education: Notice

INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOLS 2004: PLENARY LECTURE SERIES

In 2004 the International Division of the Institute of Continuing Education celebrates its eighty-first year of arranging International Summer Schools. Some 900 visitors will come to the University for periods of study lasting from two to six weeks. At the core of each Summer School are small special study classes, usually taught by members of the University. Each programme also offers plenary lectures for all participants in that Summer School, and experts from within the University and beyond are invited to contribute to these series.

These lectures have been very well received in the past, and the organizers of the Summer Schools would like, where possible, to make them more widely accessible to those with research and teaching interests in the subject concerned. The lectures are not open to the public, but where space in the lecture hall or venue permits, we are willing to make places available for members of the University to attend the plenary lectures which interest them most.

Please note: members of the University may be asked to confirm their status to one of the Institute's staff in attendance at the lecture hall. We would be grateful if those wishing to attend any of these lectures would notify us in advance. Contact details are given at the end of this list. Any unavoidable changes to the list of venues or speakers will be posted in the main Summer Schools Office (Foyer, Lady Mitchell Hall, for all except the Science Summer Schools): we suggest you arrive a few minutes in advance in order to allow time to check the location.

International Summer School: Plenary Lecture Series

The first term of the Institute of Continuing Education's seventy-second International Summer School will take place from Monday, 5 July, to Friday, 30 July. The talks in this series of lectures follow the theme of What matters? The topics have been chosen to stimulate interest amongst a group of students whose own interests are necessarily very diverse. Interpretations are far-reaching: subjects range from materials science, genetic modification, and climatology to theology, art history, botany, infrastructure, and current political events. Lectures take place on weekday mornings, in the Lady Mitchell Hall. They begin promptly at 10.30 a.m., and finish at 11.30 a.m. The series is arranged for the c. 250 participants on the International Summer School, but members of the University are cordially invited to attend.

7 July What does it all matter? by Don Cupitt
8 July Energy matters, by Professor Colin Humphreys
9 July Does the truth matter? by Professor Peter Lipton
12 July Why does genetic modification matter? by Professor Mark Tester
13 July Art: what matters? by Nicholas Friend
14 July (Why/how) does Classics matter? by Dr Paul Cartledge
15 July Why infrastructure matters, by Robert Dove
16 July Does it matter that it is getting warmer? by Dr Julian Paren
19 July Green days in forests, blue days at sea: plants and life on earth, by Professor John Parker
20 July What matters in English literature? by Dr Fred Parker
21 July Re-thinking the freedom of the press, by Professor Onora O'Neill
22 July The human revolution: prehistory and the origins of mind, by Professor Colin Renfrew
23 July Why cancer cells matter so much, by Professor Ron Laskey
26 July What matters in the war on terror? by Dr Tarak Barkawi
27 July The matter of evolution: it matters who we are, but does it matter how we got here? by Professor Simon Conway-Morris

The What matters? theme continues in several of the evening lectures, also in the Lady Mitchell Hall, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.:

7 July Why Europe matters, by Dr Julie Smith
12 July Does the monarchy matter any more? by Dr David Starkey
14 July Why dreams matter in Tibet, by Dr Alex Studholme
15 July Does 'the nation' matter? by Professor James Mayall
19 July What matters? You matter! (Students and the origins of the universities), by Piers Bursill-Hall
21 July Why being happy makes such good sense, by Dr Nick Baylis
22 July Cricket: what it is and why it matters so much, by Dr Rex Walford
26 July What matters for Israelis, what matters for Palestinians - is peace possible? by John Jackson
27 July The concept of honour in late-medieval England, by Dr Rosemary Horrox

Additional general lectures given in the evening may also be of interest to members of the University: see Joint evening lectures, below.

Summer School in Art History: Plenary Lecture Series

The Summer School in Art History will take place from Sunday, 4 July to Saturday, 24 July. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is The value of art. Morning lectures take place in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, on the Sidgwick Site at the times given below.

5 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Values spiritual, temporal, compositional 1300-1700, by Nicholas Friend
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.The expression of wealth in Tudor portraits, by Dr Richard Williams
6 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The conflict of values, by Christopher Wright
7 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Disposable art, indispensable values: festival architecture, wine fountains, and firework displays in the Baroque, by Dr Judi Loach
8 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Spiritual values and private devotion in Book of Hours, by Dr Victoria Condie
9 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.'And they call this progress?': how Chenies Manor was improved to receive Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, by Dr Jonathan Foyle
 11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Colour values, by Dr Spike Bucklow
12 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Collecting and the country house: a short history, by Nicholas Friend
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Art theft and recovery, by Richard Ellis
13 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Turner's money, by Dr David Brown
14 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The value of illuminated manuscripts, by Dr Christopher de Hamel
16 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.British visitors to the Louvre, 1802-03, by Elizabeth Allen
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.Order and value: five orders of classical architecture, by Dr Simon Bradley
19 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Modern art: challenging the notion of values, by Nicholas Friend
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.The still life: Meléndez to installation art, by Jo Rhymer
20 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The opposition between nature and technology in modern architecture, by Dr Alan Powers
21 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Portraiture, Professor Ludmilla Jordanova
22 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Yves Klein and zones of sensibility: the value of space, by James Malpas
23 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The marketing of 'good design': tastemakers and lifestyles, by Professor Jonathan Woodham
  11.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.The value of colour and line in abstract composition, by Nicholas Friend

Additional lectures given in the evening in Wolfson Court, Clarkson Road, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

7 July The value of Byzantine mosaics, by Dr Liz James
8 July Where should the Elgin marbles be? Art and national values, by Dr Nigel Spivey
12 July The Ruskin/Whistler debate, by Nicholas Friend
14 July Gothic, Gothicke, or Gothic revival, by Dr Thomas Cocke
15 July Beauty: the value of line, by Paul Antonio Attong
19 July Kettle's Yard as a teacher of aesthetic value, by Sabastiano Barassi
20 July The seventeenth-century trip: artists in Rome, Paris, and London, 1640-1700, by Lindsey Shaw-Miller
21 July The influence of Japanese aesthetic values on Western art, by Oliver Gosling

Summer School in History: Plenary Lecture Series

The Summer School in History will take place from Sunday, 4 July to Saturday, 24 July. The theme for this year's morning plenary lecture series is Cambridge history, Cambridge historians. Morning lectures take place in History Faculty Room 0.3, on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 9.15 a.m. and end at 10.30 a.m.

5 July The founding of the Cambridge History School, by Dr Mark Goldie
6 July G. M. Trevelyan, by Dr David Smith
7 July From Seeley to Gallagher, by Dr Gordon Johnson
8 July M. M. Postan, by Professor John Hatcher
9 July Betty Behrens, by Patrick Higgins
12 July E. H. Carr, by Professor Jonathan Haslam
13 July Denis Brogan; republics, history, and politics, by Dr Mike Sewell
14 July Sir Harry Hinsley, by Dr Philip Towle
15 July Sir Moses Finley, by Dr Paul Millett
19 July Gallagher, Robinson, and after, by Dr Polly O'Hanlon
20 July Roy Porter, by Professor Ludmilla Jordanova
21 July Eileen Power, by Professor Miri Rubin
22 July Cambridge history and the nation, by Dr Peter Mandler
23 July Discussion: Cambridge history, Cambridge historians, by Dr Mike Sewell

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Little Hall from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

7 July Cambridge historians and the national context (c. 1900-1980s), by Dr David Fowler
8 July Sir Herbert Butterfield, by Patrick Higgins
14 July Sir Geoffrey Elton, by Professor John Morrill
15 July Cambridge medievalists, by Dr Carl Watkins
19 July Smythe and the Victorian understanding of the French Revolution, by Professor Gareth Stedman-Jones
20 July Peter Laslett, by Dr Richard Smith
21 July Sir John Plumb, by Neil McKendrick

Shakespeare Summer School: plenary lecture series

The Shakespeare Summer School will take place from Sunday, 4 July to Saturday, 24 July. Morning lectures take place in the Lecture Block, Room 3, on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 11.30 a.m., and end at 12.30 p.m.

5 July Seeing Shakespeare, by Dr Charles Moseley
6 July Shakespeare, the Scots, and Early Modern England, by Professor John Kerrigan
7 July Shakespeare and nothing, Professor Terry Eagleton
8 July Shakespeare' s teachers I, by Professor Brian Vickers
9 July Shakespeare's teachers II, by Professor Brian Vickers
12 July Afterlife of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', by Dr Catherine Alexander
13 July The medicinal comedy of 'Love's Labour's Lost', by Dr Philippa Berry
14 July The internationalism of Shakespeare, by Professor Robert Smallwood
15 July The Roman plays, by Professor Laurence Lerner
19 July The politics of sleep in 'The Tempest', by Professor William Sherman
20 July On Shakespearean ethics, by John Joughin
21 July Hamlet, Machiavelli, and revenge, by Dr John Roe
22 July Shakespeare in hate, by Professor Richard Wilson
23 July 'Art made tongue-tied by authority'?: the censoring of Shakespeare, by Professor Cedric Watts

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Lecture Block, Room 3, on the Sidgwick Site, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

7 July Ellen Terry, Shakespeare, and Lady Macbeth, by Dr Catherine Alexander
8 July Shakespeare's London, by Dr Charles Moseley
14 July Shakespeare and Rome, by Professor Laurence Lerner
15 July Shakespeare and Purcell, by Dr Alexander Lindsay
21 July 'The Taming of the Shrew': a play for today? by Professor Cedric Watts

Science Summer School: plenary lecture series

The Science Summer School will take place from Sunday, 11 July to Saturday, 31 July. The theme for this year's plenary lecture series is What matters?. Lectures take place in the Reddaway Room, Fitzwilliam College at the times given below. Lectures marked ** take place elsewhere and are, unfortunately, open only to participants in the Science Summer School.

12 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Does the truth matter? by Professor Peter Lipton
13 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Stellar evolution, by Dr Robin Catchpole
14 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Planet ocean, by Dr Julian Priddle
15 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Energy matters, by Professor Colin Humphreys
 11.15 a.m. - 12.45 p.m.**Green days in forests, blue days at sea: plants and life on Earth, by Professor John Parker
16 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.**Finding our feet in Greenland (lecture), by Dr Jenny Clack
  11.15 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.**Finding our feet in Greenland (demonstration), by Dr Jenny Clack
19 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Coral reefs: here today, gone tomorrow. Does it matter? I, by Frances Dipper
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.Coral reefs: here today, gone tomorrow. Does it matter? II, by Frances Dipper
20 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Why size matters, by Dr Matt Wilkinson
21 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Building embryos: beyond the laws of physics, by Dr Alfonso Martinez Arias
22 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.**Nanoparticles, by Dr Neil Greenham
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.**Dark energy - a new form of matter, by Professor Malcolm Longair
23 July 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.If I were a clone, would I matter as much? by Dr Lynne Harrison
  11 a.m. - 12.45 p.m.**Fertility matters, by Professor W. R. Allen
26 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.The matter of evolution: it matters who we are, but does it matter how we got here? I, by Professor Simon Conway-Morris
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.The matter of evolution: it matters who we are, but does it matter how we got here? II, by Professor Simon Conway-Morris
27 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Maths matters, by Brian Catlow
28 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Plants and a changing climate - future perfect or imperfect - is there a tense situation ahead? by Professor Howard Griffiths
29 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Are there other dimensions? by Professor John Barrow
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.In the grip of gravity, by Dr Kevin Marshall
30 July 9.15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.Dark matter, by Professor Andrew Fabian
  11 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.Cancer and how our bodies avoid it, by Professor Ron Laskey

Additional lectures given in the evening may also be of interest:

14 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Kyoto: kill or cure? by Dr Julian Paren
15 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.The human genome: 'got the T-shirt' - what matters now? by Dr Stephan Beck
20 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Boomerangs are more predictable than you think, by Dr Hugh Hunt
21 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Decoding the genome: innovative approaches to studying the cell cycle, by Dr Monica Bettencourt-Dias
22 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Why being happy makes such good sense, by Dr Nick Baylis
26 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.Watt matters? by Piers Bursill-Hall
28 July 8 p.m. - 9 p.m.What matters most? by Dr Lynne Harrison

Medieval Studies Summer School: Plenary Lecture Series

The Medieval Studies Summer School will take place from Sunday, 25 July to Saturday, 14 August. Morning lectures take place in the Runcie Room, Faculty of Divinity, on the Sidgwick Site, at the times shown below.

26 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.The Albigensian Crusades: 'war crimes' in the thirteenth century? by Professor Malcolm Barber
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m.Richard the Lionheart and the development of English kingship, by Professor Nigel Saul
27 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Alice Chaucer, Dutchess of Suffolk (d. 1475): menace or matriarch? by Dr Rowena E. Archer
28 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Debating heresy: fifteenth-century vernacular theology and Arundel's constitution (1409), by Dr Sarah James
29 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Perceptions, by Dr Amanda Power
30 July 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.The Fourth Crusade and the sack of Constantinople, 1204, by Dr Jonathan Phillips
2 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Lollardy and Orthodoxy in late medieval England, by Dr Richard Rex
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m.Gods, graves, and pottery: the archaeology of pagan Anglo-Saxon religion, by Dr Catherine Hills
3 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.'Ful mery in hevyn': heavenly imagery in medieval English parish churches, by Dr Lynne Broughton
4 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.1066 and a biography of William the Conqueror, by Professor David Bates
5 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Medieval victuallers, hawkers, and pedlars, by Dr James Davis
6 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Symbolism, bigamy, and consummation, by Professor David d'Avray
9 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Music fit for a queen? Isabel of Castile (d.1504) as a patron of the arts, by Dr Tess Knighton
11.30a.m. - 12.45 p.m.Time off for good behaviour. Building your way out of Purgatory, by Dr Francis Woodman
10 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Stained glass windows for prelates and princes, by Sarah Brown
11 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.'A fond thing vainly invented': the abolition of Purgatory and the destruction of tomb-monuments in the Reformation, by Phillip Lindley
12 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.The evolution of medieval housing, by Leigh Alston
13 August 9.30 a.m. - 10.45 a.m.Knights of Venus: courtliness and manliness in later medieval England, by Professor W. Mark Ormrod
11.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m.Designing medieval buildings, by Professor Eric Fernie

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Lecture Block Room 3, on the Sidgwick Site, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

27 July The concept of honour in late medieval England, by Dr Rosemary Horrox
29 July 'Getting medieval': the making of Gothic art for England, 1400-1547, by Professor Richard Marks
3 August A call to arms - some reflections on heraldry, by Tim Milner
4 August Monks 'back to back'. The medieval lavatory, by Dr Francis Woodman
5 August Islam and its contributions to the medieval world, by Piers Bursill-Hall
9 August Human or beast? Probing the edges of civilization in the 'romance of Perceforest', by Dr Sylvia Huot
11 August Medieval ghosts, by Dr Carl Watkins

Summer School in English Literature: Plenary Lecture Series

The Summer School in English Literature will take place from Sunday, 25 July to Saturday, 14 August. The theme of the Gender, sexuality, and desire has been chosen for this year's lectures, which take place in the Little Hall, on the Sidgwick Site. They start promptly at 11.30 a.m., and finish at 12.30 p.m.

26 July Shakespeare in love, by Dr Fred Parker
27 July What men did together; writing, sexuality, and politics, by Dr Geoffrey Gilbert
28 July Jane Eyre's daydreams, by Dr Heather Glen
29 July Blake's spiritual body, by Dr Simon Jarvis
30 July Fin-de-siècle Elizabeths: rewriting queenship in poetry and drama at the end of the sixteenth century, by Dr Philippa Berry
2 August Dickens and divorce: the Victorian novel and the Matrimonial Causes Act, 1857, by Dr Corinna Russell
3 August Sex and the single male, by Dr Colin Burrow
4 August 'The public woman': the actress-whore connection, 1660-1700, by Dr Sarah Burton
5 August Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes: gender politics and poetry in 'Ariel' and 'Birthday Letters', by Dr Felicity Rosslyn
9 August Voyeurism and epistolarity in Richardson's 'Pamela', by Dr Phil Connell
10 August Love and hate: psychoanalysis, literature, ambivalence, by Dr Trudi Tate
11 August Romantic confessions: Hazlitt's 'Liber Amoris', by Dr Gregory Dart
12 August Desire in history: Thomas Hardy's short stories, by Dr Rod Mengham
13 August Modernism and feminism, by Alison Hennegan

Additional lectures given in the evening in the Little Hall, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., may also be of interest (see also Joint evening lectures, below):

27 July The study of English, by Dr Fred Parker
29 July Pope: poems to two sisters, by Dr Alexander Lindsay
3 August, Traditional songs of modern war, by Dr John Lennard
5 August A feeling for poetry, by Dr Stephen Logan
11 August The practice of poetry, by Clive Wilmer

Iternational Summer School Term II

These take place in the Lady Mitchell Hall, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.:

2 August 'He's fat and scant of breath' (Act 5, scene 2, line 239 'Hamlet'). Shakespeare and the politics of size, by Simon Browne
3 August Tony Blair: an elective dictatorship, by Richard Yates
5 August Aztec metropolis: an allegory for our own? by Dr Nicholas James
11 August What matters? You matter! (Students and the origins of the universities), by Piers Bursill-Hall

International Summer Schools: Joint evening lecture series

A number of lectures have been arranged for the benefit of more than one Summer School. These take place in the Lady Mitchell Hall, from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.:

6 July Cambridge and the Colleges, by Rosemary Horrox
8 July Shakespeare's London, by Dr Charles Moseley
9 July Introduction to 'Much Ado About Nothing', by Simon Browne
12 July Does the monarchy matter any more? by Dr David Starkey
16 July An introduction to 'Romeo and Juliet', by Dr Charles Moseley
19 July What matters? You matter! (Students and the origins of the universities), by Piers Bursill-Hall
20 July The playing of space, by Graham Christopher
27 July Honour in late-medieval England, by Dr Rosemary Horrox
28 July 'Beowulf', by Dr Andrew Orchard and Clive Wilmer
2 August Medieval love-sickness, by Dr Jacqueline Tasioulas
4 August England, England! Englishness in recent British fiction, by Dr Adrian Barlow
6 August An introduction to 'Hamlet', by Dr Fred Parker
9 August Undressing Mr Darcy, by Gilliam Stapleton

Your response to these lectures is invited

We would be interested to hear your response to any of the plenary lectures you have heard. If you have comments, or wish to know more about teaching on the Summer Schools, please write to Sarah Ormrod, Director of International Programmes, Institute of Continuing Education, Madingley Hall, Madingley (tel. 140-216 or e-mail sjo1001@cam.ac.uk).


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Cambridge University Reporter 30 June 2004
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