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Report of the Faculty Board of Music on amendments to the regulations for the Music Tripos

The FACULTY BOARD OF MUSIC beg leave to report to the University as follows:

1. In this Report the Faculty Board of Music propose new arrangements for the three Parts, Part IA, Part IB, and Part II, of the Music Tripos.

2. The existing Music Tripos has been in place for some twenty years, though undergoing small changes periodically. At a Faculty Board meeting in the Michaelmas Term 1999 it was decided to undertake a thorough revision of the Tripos. Following a number of consultation meetings with both students and Directors of Studies, draft regulations were prepared by the Teaching Committee of the Faculty Board and fully debated in a number of meetings of the Faculty's University Teaching Officers. The revised regulations set out in the Annex to this Report were approved by the Faculty Board at its meeting on 15 February 2001.

3. In proposing these new arrangements, which are set out in greater detail in paragraphs 4 to 6 below, the Faculty Board seek:

(i) to adjust the content of Part IA in order to cater better for the changing skills of students as they arrive in Cambridge;
(ii) to add some further degree of choice to Part IB and (particularly) to Part II, thus allowing students further opportunities to develop the areas of musical study in which they excel;
(iii) to simplify the course as a whole, in particular abolishing the previous distinction between 'set works' and 'historical topics', which had become blurred and was serving no useful purpose.

4. Under the new arrangements the examination for Part IA will remain broadly the same. Part IA is, and must remain, a foundation course involving an introduction to historical subjects, musical techniques, analysis, and practical musicianship. However, the demands of Papers 1 and 2 (Harmony and Counterpoint) have been somewhat simplified (as the technical aspects of 'A' Level in Music are becoming pro-gressively less stringent). The Faculty Board have also made the 'notation' aspect of Music history more integrated with other historical teaching, and simplified the practical demands in what is now Paper 6 (Practical musicianship).

5. In the examination for Part IB the two core papers in the present regulations (which will become Paper 1, Portfolio of tonal compositions, and Paper 2, Analysis and repertoire) remain largely the same. In the study of historical topics the distinction between set works and other topics has been abolished. The compulsory paper in Musical acoustics has been removed and replaced as an optional topic among the additional papers. These changes have made way for new Papers 3-5, which allow students to offer subjects that have hitherto been either absent or possible only in the final year: these include free composition, a dissertation, and advanced keyboard skills. The Faculty Board also propose to add an optional paper in musical performance: almost all the students studying music in Cambridge spend much time playing a musical instrument, and it seemed fitting that this aspect of their musical attainments should be able to contribute in some small way to their examination result in Part IB.

6. In the examination for Part II, the compulsory fugue has been dropped: this was becoming an unrealistic requirement considering the level at which students enter the programme. Instead, there is a choice between a variety of technical subjects and a dissertation. As well as (again) abolishing the distinction between set works and other topics, the option has been added of two further portfolio examinations, in notation and in analysis. The increased range of choice in Part II will allow students to specialize further, and also to avoid taking more than two three-hour written examinations if they so wish. The Faculty Board gave considerable thought to the fact that this arrangement reduces the number of three-hour written examinations in its new Tripos. However, the Board considered that the study of Music is a special case because some of its core disciplines are not conducive to the three-hour examination format. This clearly applies to performance and free composition, which have rarely or never been examined in this way. It also now applies to Musical techniques at an advanced level: because of large-scale developments in the teaching of music in schools, many students who gain a great deal from the study of techniques now prove incapable of writing music of any sophistication (the type required in Parts IB and II) under examination conditions, in particular without access to a keyboard. Analysis is a further discipline at the core of the Music Tripos, and although aspects of analytical technique can be examined in a three-hour paper, there are many sophisticated analytical operations that, while certainly within a talented student's grasp, cannot be completed under strictly timed conditions. The Faculty Board of Music very much wish to keep all these aspects of musical study on the curriculum, to allow students to excel in them and, to some degree in their second and third years, to specialize in them. In order to do this, the Board have had to allow for an unusual proportion of papers outside the three-hour format.

7. The Faculty Board have taken great care to make sure that the overall number of supervisions entailed in the new Tripos is somewhat reduced from its present level, which has generally been thought rather high by University standards. Although they believe that students in the new Tripos will certainly need to work as hard as do those at present, the Board have striven for a more even distribution of supervisions over the various disciplines, in particular by making sure that Part II students have supervisions in historical subjects (which is not at present the case). Although numbers inevitably vary between Colleges, our calculations suggest that the present Tripos involves yearly supervision loads of 62 hours (Part IA), 32 hours (Part IB), and 30 hours (Part II). Under the new scheme, the numbers will be 52 hours (Part IA), 34 hours (Part IB), and 27 hours (Part II).

8. The Faculty Board have given careful consideration to the arrangements for teaching and examining under the proposed regulations and for the administration of the new courses. They are confident that their proposals can be successfully implemented within the resources currently available to the Faculty.

9. Supplementary regulations for the new Tripos have been approved by the Faculty Board. These are set out in the Appendix to this Report.

10. As a result of the proposed revision of the regulations for the Tripos, a minor amendment to the regulations for the William Barclay Squire Prize is also included in the recommendations to this Report.

11. The Faculty Board recommend:

I. That the regulations for the Music Tripos be replaced by the regulations set out in the Annex to this Report in accordance with the timetable contained in Temporary Regulation 25.

II. That the regulations for the William Barclay Squire Prize (Statutes and Ordinances, p. 841) be amended, with effect from 1 October 2001, so as to read:

Regulations 3-4.

3. The Prize shall be awarded each year by the Examiners for Part II of the Music Tripos to a candidate who has shown distinction in any two papers which in the judgement of the Examiners are to be regarded as on subjects in the history of music.

4. The value of the Prize shall be such sum as shall be determined by the Faculty Board of Music within a range approved from time to time by the Council.

8 March 2001     R. L.PARKER, (Chairman)      STEPHEN HEATH           LLINOS ELIN OWEN
  STEFANO CASTELVECCHI     ROBIN HOLLOWAY    SUSAN RANKIN
  IAN CROSS DEBORAH HOWARD W. D. SUTCLIFFE
  IMOGEN HARES ANDREW V.JONES ROGER TOMKYS

ANNEX

MUSIC TRIPOS

NEW REGULATIONS

1. The Music Tripos shall consist of three Parts: Part IA, Part IB, and Part II.

2. A student may be a candidate for honours in Part IA if he or she has kept one term, provided that three complete terms have not passed after his or her first term of residence.

3. A student who has obtained honours in Part IA of the Music Tripos or in another Honours Examination may be a candidate for honours in Part IB1 in the year next after so obtaining honours, provided that twelve complete terms have not passed after his or her first term of residence.

4. A student who has obtained honours in Part IB of the Music Tripos may be a candidate for honours in Part II in the year next after so obtaining honours, provided that twelve complete terms have not passed after his or her first term of residence.

5. No student shall be a candidate for more than one Part, or for any Part and also for another Honours Examination or the Mus.B. Examination, in the same term.

6. No student who has been a candidate for honours in any Part shall again be a candidate for honours in the same Part.

7. Subject to the provisions of Regulation 5, a student who is not eligible to be a candidate for honours may be a candidate for any Part of the Tripos so as to qualify as a candidate for the Mus.B. Examination, provided that he or she has kept four terms at least.

8. There shall be three separate bodies of Examiners, one for Part IA, one for Part IB, and one for Part II. The Faculty Board of Music shall nominate such number of Examiners as they shall deem sufficient to conduct the examinations.

9. The Faculty Board shall have power to nominate one or more Assessors to assist the Examiners in any of the subjects of the Tripos. Assessors shall be responsible for setting the paper or papers or other tests in the subjects assigned to them, and shall present to the Examiners such written reports as the Examiners may require. Assessors may be summoned, for the purpose of consultation and advice, to meetings of the Examiners, but shall not be entitled to vote.

1 See also the regulations for Affiliated Students.

10. There shall be a separate class-list for each Part of the Tripos. In each list the names of the successful candidates shall be arranged in three classes, of which the second shall be divided into two divisions. The names in each of the first and third classes and in each division of the second class shall be arranged in alphabetical order. In each class-list a mark of distinction may be awarded for special excellence.

11. The names of candidates who have satisfied the Examiners under Regulation 7 shall be placed in an alphabetical list headed 'The following (who are not candidates for honours) have attained the honours standard'.

12. The scheme of examination for Part IA shall be:

Paper 1. Harmony.

Paper 2. Counterpoint.

Paper 3. Historical subjects I.

Paper 4. Historical subjects II and ethnomusicology.

Paper 5. Analysis and repertoire.

Paper 6. Practical musicianship.

Papers 1-5 shall be of three hours' duration. Paper 6 shall consist of an aural test of not more than three hours' duration, together with a separate keyboard test. A candidate for Part IA shall offer all the papers for that Part.

13. The scheme of examination for Part IB shall be:

Paper 1. Portfolio of tonal compositions.

Paper 2. Analysis and repertoire.

Paper 3. Portfolio of free compositions.

Paper 4. Dissertation.

Paper 5. Advanced keyboard skills.

The Faculty Board shall have the power to prescribe, not later than the division of the Easter Term in the year next before the examination to which they apply, not more than six additional papers, which will be divided into two sections: (A) Historical topics and (B) Other topics.

Each paper shall be of three hours' duration, with the following exceptions:

(a) Papers 1 and 3, which shall be submitted in accordance with Regulation 18;

(b) Paper 4, which shall be submitted in accordance with Regulation 19;

(c) Paper 5, which shall consist of a practical test of keyboard skills, candidates being required to play on a variety of keyboard instruments;

(d) in announcing additional papers, the Faculty Board shall have the power, subject to the approval of the General Board, to specify an alternative mode of examination for one or more of those papers.

14. A candidate for Part IB shall offer five papers in all: Papers 1 and 2; and three other papers chosen from Papers 3-5 and from the additional papers prescribed by the Faculty Board, provided that at least one paper shall be from Section A of the additional papers. At least two of the papers must be from among those examined by a three-hour written examination.

15. A candidate for Part IB shall be allowed to present a recital either on an instrument or of singing. Such a recital, if of sufficient merit, may be taken into account by the Examiners.

16. The scheme of the examination for Part II shall be:

Paper 1. Dissertation.

Paper 2. Fugue.

Paper 3. Portfolio of advanced tonal compositions.

Paper 4. Portfolio of free compositions.

Paper 5. Analysis portfolio.

Paper 6. Notation portfolio.

Paper 7. Test of performance.

The Faculty Board shall have the power to prescribe, not later than the division of the Easter Term in the year next before the examination to which they apply, not more than ten additional papers.

Each paper shall be of three hours' duration, with the following exceptions:

(a) Paper 1, which shall be submitted in accordance with Regulation 19;

(b) Paper 2, which shall be of four hours' duration;

(c) Papers 3-6, which shall be submitted in accordance with Regulation 18;

(d) the examination for Paper 7 shall consist of a recital either on an instrument or of singing, together with the submission of an essay, of not more than 3,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices but including footnotes) on a related subject, which shall be submitted in accordance with the provisions of Regulation 20;

(e) in announcing additional papers, the Faculty Board shall have the power, subject to the approval of the General Board, to specify an alternative mode of examination for one or more of those papers.

17. A candidate for Part II shall offer six papers in all: these shall include at least one and not more than three from Papers 1-4, provided that no candidate may offer in combination Papers 2, 3, and 4; and at least two from the additional papers prescribed by the Faculty Board. At least two of the papers must be from among those examined by a three-hour written examination.

18. A candidate who offers either Paper 1 or 3 in Part IB, or any among Papers 3-6 in Part II, shall submit the portfolio to the Chairman of Examiners so as to arrive not later than the division of the Easter Term in which the examination is held. The compositions, analyses, or transcriptions contained in such a portfolio shall be written by the candidate during the current academical year; each separate item shall be initialled by the teacher under whose direction it was written, as an indication that the teacher approves the submission. Candidates will be required to declare that the contents of the portfolio are their own work and that they do not contain material already used to any substantial extent for a comparable purpose.

19. (a) The examination for Paper 4 in Part IB and Paper 1 in Part II shall consist of a dissertation on a musical subject of the candidate's own choice approved by the Faculty Board which falls wholly or substantially outside the subject or subjects chosen by the candidate for any other papers. A candidate who wishes to offer such a dissertation shall submit the proposed title to the relevant Chairman of Examiners so as to arrive not later than the fourth day of the Full Lent Term preceding the examination.

(b) Each candidate must obtain the approval of the proposed subject by the Teaching Committee of the Faculty Board not later than the division of the Lent Term.

(c) A dissertation for Part IB shall be of not less than 5,000 words and not more than 7,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices but including footnotes). A dissertation for Part II shall be of not less than 7,000 words and not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices but including footnotes). Dissertations shall be in typewritten form, unless previous permission has been obtained from the Chairman of Examiners to present the dissertation in manuscript.

(d) Dissertations shall be submitted to the appropriate Chairman of Examiners so as to arrive not later than the eighth day of the Full Easter Term in which the examination is to be held.

20. An essay offered in fulfilment of the requirements for Paper 7 of Part II shall be on a subject of the candidate's choice approved by the Faculty Board which is related in a manner prescribed by supplementary regulations to the contents of the recital given by the candidate for that paper. Each candidate offering Paper 7 shall obtain the approval by the Teaching Committee of the Faculty Board of the title of the essay, and shall submit the essay, in accordance with the timetable prescribed for dissertations in Regulation 19(a), (b), and (d). Essays shall be in typewritten form, unless previous permission has been obtained from the Chairman of Examiners to present the dissertation in manuscript.

21. Each candidate submitting a dissertation under Regulation 19, or an essay under Regulation 20 or for any other paper, will be required to sign a declaration that the dissertation or essay is her or his own work, unaided except as may be specified in the declaration, and that it does not contain material that has already been used to any substantial extent for a comparable purpose.

22. For the purpose of drawing up the class-list the Examiners for Part II shall have the power to call a candidate for interview on matters arising from the examination, but they shall take account of such an interview only if it would be to the candidate's advantage.

23. The Faculty Board may issue from time to time supplementary regulations defining all or any of the subjects of the examination, and may modify or alter such supplementary regulations as occasion may require, due care being taken that sufficient notice is given of any alteration.

24. Before the division of the Easter Term in each year the Faculty Board shall give notice of the subjects to be set for Papers 3 and 4 of Part IA for the examination to be held in the academical year next following, provided that the Board shall have the power of subsequently issuing amendments if they have due reason for doing so and if they are satisfied that no student's preparation for the examination is adversely affected.

Not less than two weeks before the start of the examination by written papers, the Board shall notify candidates of the works prescribed for Paper 5 of Part IA and Paper 2 of Part IB.

Temporary Regulation

25. The examinations for the Music Tripos, Parts IA, IB, and II, shall be held under the New Regulations for the first time as follows:

For Part IA in 2002,

For Part IB in 2003,

For Part II in 2004.

The examinations for the Music Tripos, Parts IA, IB, and II, shall be held under the Old Regulations for the last time as follows:

For Part IA in 2001,

For Part IB in 2002,

For Part II in 2003.

APPENDIX

SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS

Part Ia

Paper 1.  Harmony

Candidates will be required to answer two out of three questions: either to write variations on a ground bass; or to complete for string quartet a movement or section of a movement of which the opening has been given; or to complete the accompaniment of a given melody in an eighteenth- or early nineteenth-century idiom.

Paper 2.  Counterpoint

Candidates will be required to answer two questions: to work counterpoint in sixteenth-century style in three parts; and to write a fugal exposition in four parts, using invertible counterpoint.

Paper 3.  Historical subjects I

The paper will be divided into two sections. The first will contain questions on a subject in Western music; candidates will be required to answer two questions. The second will include questions on the principles of editing, using materials related to the period or repertory prescribed for the first section; candidates will be required to answer one question.

Paper 4.  Historical subjects II and ethnomusicology

The paper will be divided into two sections. The first will contain questions on a subject in Western music. The second will contain questions on a subject in ethnomusicology. Candidates will be required to answer three questions, at least one from each section.

Paper 5.  Analysis and repertoire

The paper will be divided into two sections. In the first section, compositions, or extracts from compositions, either from the period 1700-1750 or from the period 1750-1830 will be prescribed not less than two weeks before the start of the examination by written papers. The choice of period for the prescribed works will be at the Examiners' discretion. Candidates will be permitted to bring unmarked copies of the relevant scores into the examination, and will be required to answer questions on the prescribed works. In the second section, compositions or extracts from compositions from the period not represented by the prescribed works will be provided for analysis. Candidates will be required to answer three questions, at least one from each section.

Paper 6.  Practical musicianship

Aural tests will include: a memorization test (rhythms); dictation exercises (melodies and three-part counterpoint); a mistake-spotting test; timbre recognition and scoring exercises; recognition of set pieces; and aural analysis.

Keyboard tests will include: reading the score of a string quartet; transposition of a chorale; harmonization of a melody (in a style from the period before 1830); realization of a figured bass at the keyboard; and reading three-part sixteenth-century counterpoint using C3, C4, and F4 clefs.

Part Ib

Paper 1.  Portfolio of tonal compositions

Candidates will be required to submit a portfolio comprising two tonal compositions and a fugue in three or four parts, together with a recording, on conventional instruments, of one of the two compositions. The compositions shall be in different forms chosen from the following: binary, ternary, scherzo and trio, ritornello, rondo, theme and variations, sonata. The fugue must demonstrate knowledge of invertible counterpoint, and may be scored for any traditional combination of instruments; it should not exceed seventy bars in length.

In place of one of the two compositions, candidates may submit a through-composed song or group of songs, each of which must possess a clear and appropriate formal structure, for solo voice and piano accompaniment, or for solo voice and accompaniment by a group of instruments. Each composition or group of songs shall be of not more than five minutes' duration, excluding repeats, and shall be for an ensemble of not more than five players. One composition may be for solo keyboard (including organ) or other polyphonic instrument, but melody instruments may be used only in ensemble. The fugue may also be for a keyboard instrument. Candidates will be responsible for providing the recording, but the quality of recorded sound will not contribute to the final mark.

Paper 2.  Analysis and repertoire

The paper will be divided into two sections. In the first, compositions, or extracts from compositions, either from the period 1830-1914 or from the period 1914 to the present day will be prescribed not less than two weeks before the start of the examination by written papers. The choice of period for the prescribed works will be at the Examiners' discretion. Candidates will be permitted to bring unmarked copies of the relevant scores into the examination, and will be required to answer questions on the works. In the second section, compositions or extracts from compositions from the period not represented by the prescribed works will be provided for analysis. Candidates will be required to answer three questions, at least one from each section.

Paper 3.  Portfolio of free compositions

Candidates will be required to submit a portfolio of three compositions. One should be a setting of words, and one should include either fugal elements or incorporate the techniques of groundbass and/or chaconne. Normal staff notation will usually be expected, but electro-acoustic submissions are also acceptable. In addition, each candidate must submit a recording of at least one of the three pieces.

Paper 5.  Advanced keyboard skills

The examination will consist of five components. Three will be examined after a total of ten minutes' preparation by the candidate: (i) harmonization of a melody; (ii) orchestral score-reading; and (iii) vocal score-reading (C1, C3, C4, and F4 clefs). The other two components - (iv) figured bass and (v) transposition of a song accompaniment - will be given out two days before the examination. The instrumentalist and singer with whom to perform, respectively, (iv) and (v) will be supplied by the Examiners.

Recital

The examination will consist of a recital of not more than ten minutes' duration either on an instrument or of singing. Candidates should inform the Chairman of Examiners not later than the division of the Lent Term next preceding the examination of the instrument chosen or the type of voice (this information must be supplied in written form, and initialled by the candidate's Director of Studies). Candidates must provide an accompanist or page turner (or both) if required.

Part II

Paper 2.  Fugue

Candidates will be required to compose a fugue in not more than four parts from a choice of subjects.

Paper 3.  Portfolio of advanced tonal compositions

Candidates will be required to submit a portfolio comprising two substantial compositions in a tonal idiom of the mid to late nineteenth century, together with a recording, on conventional instruments, of one of the two works. The compositions shall be of two different types, both to be taken from the following: string quartet, string quintet, piano trio, piano quartet, piano quintet, sonata for melody instrument and piano, piano sonata, song cycle for voice and piano. A non-texted work should comprise at least three movements; all works should be at least twenty minutes in length.

Paper 4.  Portfolio of free compositions

Candidates will be required to submit a portfolio of four compositions. One should be a setting of words for solo voices and/or chorus in no fewer than three parts, and one should include either fugal elements or incorporate the techniques of groundbass and/or chaconne. Normal staff notation will usually be expected, but electro-acoustic submissions are also acceptable. Each candidate must submit a recording of at least one of the four pieces.

Paper 5.  Analysis portfolio

Candidates will be required to submit three essays involving the use of analytical techniques, to a maximum total length of 10,000 words.

Paper 6.  Notation portfolio

Candidates will be required to submit three projects involving the study of notations and of original source material, to a maximum total length of 6,000 words in addition to transcriptions.

Paper 7.  Test of performance

The examination for this paper will consist of two elements, (i) a test of performance and (ii) the submission of an essay.

(i) The test of performance will be as follows:

Either (a) on an historical instrument or in accompaniment of an historical instrument

For option (a) candidates will be required to demonstrate the technical and musical aspects of performance on their chosen instrument, by presenting a recital of not more than twenty-three minutes' playing time which shall include one piece set by the Examiners after consultation with the candidate during the Michaelmas Term next preceding the examination. Details of the complete programme must be sent to the Secretary of the Faculty Board for approval, so as to arrive not later than the fourth day of the Full Lent Term next preceding the examination. Two copies of the pieces of the candidate's choice should be brought to the examination. Candidates must provide an accompanist or page turner (or both) if required. Candidates will be questioned by the Examiners on matters relevant to their recitals.

Or (b) on a modern instrument or in accompaniment of a modern instrument

Or (c) in singing

For options (b) and (c) the test will consist of a recital of not more than twenty-three minutes' playing time including a piece or a song (or songs) prescribed by the Examiners not later than the end of Full Michaelmas Term next preceding the examination. Candidates must inform the Secretary of the Faculty Board not later than the division of that term of the instrument chosen or the type of voice. Details of the complete programme must be sent to the Secretary of the Faculty Board for approval by the Faculty Board, so as to arrive not later than the fourth day of the Full Lent Term next preceding the examination. Candidates must provide an accompanist or page turner (or both) if required.

(ii) The essay should discuss the reception or performing history (including, where appropriate, the recording history) of one of the pieces chosen by the candidate for the recital.


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Cambridge University Reporter, 16 May 2001
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