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Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Second M.B. Examination, and Second Veterinary M.B. Examination, 2001: Notice by the Faculty Board of Biology, the Faculty Board of Clinical Medicine, and the Faculty Board of Clinical Veterinary Medicine

The Faculty Board of Biology, the Faculty Board of Clinical Medicine, and the Faculty Board of Clinical Veterinary Medicine give notice that the form of the examinations for Part IA of the Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, the Second M.B. Examination, and the Second Veterinary M.B. Examination, which will be held for the first time in 2001, will be as follows:

Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part Ia

Functional Architecture of the Body

Candidates will be examined by a written paper carrying 67 per cent of the total mark and a practical examination carrying 33 per cent of the total mark.

The written paper will be divided into two Sections, I and III. Section I will last one hour and will carry 17 per cent of the total marks. Each question is compulsory and will carry an equivalent mark. Some questions may adopt a multiple-choice format, requiring 'true/false' decisions. The questions will examine tissue anatomy, aspects of organogenesis, and the topographical, functional, and clinically applied anatomy of the human body. Candidates will be required to answer briefly and concisely with key phrases and diagrams. Section III will last two hours and will carry 50 per cent of the total mark. Section III will be divided into two parts, each containing three questions. Candidates will answer one question from each part, spending one hour on each. Each question will carry an equivalent mark. Part A will require an answer in essay format and will examine the ability to integrate structure with function and to construct logical arguments. Part B will also be in essay format and will assess the ability to apply anatomical knowledge to a clinical situation or problem and to deduce basic clinical implications from first, anatomical principles. Neither part will require any more detailed factual knowledge of anatomy than Section I and II.

The practical examination (Section II) will last two hours and will carry 33 per cent of the total mark. It consists of a circuit of stations at each of which a specimen or a problem is placed. Candidates must move between stations every few minutes and answer one or more questions in a short set time. Each station will carry an equivalent number of marks. The examination will assess a similar range of knowledge to Section I and will include recognition and interpretation of photographic, diagrammatic, radiological, skeletal, and prosected material.

Homeostasis

Candidates will be examined by a written paper carrying 80 per cent of the total mark and the submission of practical notebooks carrying 20 per cent of the total mark.

The written paper will be divided into two Sections, I and III. Section I will last one hour and will carry 30 per cent of the total marks. Each question is compulsory and will require short answers. Some questions may adopt a multiple-choice format. Section III will last two hours and will carry 50 per cent of the total mark. Section III will cover the whole course. It will contain five sections requiring essay answers of which candidates will answer two.

The practical examination (Section II) will last two hours and will carry 20 per cent of the total mark. It will cover the experimental physiology and histology classes, and will include questions which require the analysis and interpretation of data from physiological experiments.

Practical notebooks bearing the signatures of teachers under whose direction the work was performed must be submitted to the Examiners for approval by five days after the last practical class.

Molecules in Medical Science

Candidates will be examined by two written papers carrying 50 per cent of the total mark each.

The first written paper will be divided into two Sections, I and II. Section I will last one hour and will carry 33 per cent of the total marks. Each question is compulsory and will carry an equivalent mark. Some questions may adopt a multiple-choice format. The questions will examine the lecture material and the problem-based learning exercises. Section II will last two hours and will carry 17 per cent of the total mark. It will consist of questions on practical aspects of the course, including interpretation and handling of data. The questions may require knowledge of the lecture course whilst focusing on the experience obtained in the laboratory- and computer-based exercises.

The second written paper, Section III, will last two hours and will carry 50 per cent of the total mark. The paper will be divided into three Subsections, A, B, and C, each containing three or four essay questions. Candidates will answer one question from each subsection. Subsection A will relate principally to the lectures given in the Michaelmas Term and Subsection B principally to lectures given in the Lent and Easter Terms. The questions in Subsection C will be of broad scope and draw on the entire course of lectures and practical exercises. The nature of the questions in Section III shall be to test integrated understanding rather than detailed factual knowledge.

Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology

Candidates will be examined by a written paper carrying 67 per cent of the total mark and a practical examination carrying 33 per cent of the total mark.

The written paper will be divided into two Sections, I and III. Section I will last one hour and will carry 17 per cent of the total marks. Each question is compulsory and will require short answers. Some questions may adopt a multiple-choice format. Section III will last two hours and will carry 50 per cent of the total mark. Section III will be divided into two parts. Candidates will answer one question from each part, spending one hour on each. Each question will carry an equivalent mark. Part A will require an answer in essay format and will examine the ability to integrate structure with function and to construct logical arguments. Part B will also be in essay format and will assess the ability to apply anatomical knowledge to a clinical situation or problem and/or to deduce basic clinical implications from first principles.

The practical examination (Section II) will last two hours and will carry 33 per cent of the total mark. It consists of a circuit of stations at each of which a specimen or a problem is placed. Candidates must move between stations every few minutes and answer one or more questions in a short set time. Each station will carry an equivalent number of marks. The examination will assess core knowledge and understanding of any aspect of anatomy and its application. The questions are in the form of short answer or multiple choice and may include ones that test identification of structures, deduction, functional interpretation, appropriate use of language, and knowledge of anatomical techniques.

Second M.B. Examination (Revised Regulations)

Functional Architecture of the Body

For details of the examination in this subject see the entry for Functional Architecture of the Body under Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part IA, above. The Second M.B. Examination will be determined by the performance of students in Sections I and II only.

Homeostasis

For details of the examination in this subject see the entry for Homeostasis under Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part IA, above. The Second M.B. Examination will be determined by the performance of students in Sections I and II only. Candidates will be required to submit satisfactory practical notebooks to meet the requirements of the Second M.B. Examination regulation for diligent attendance.

Medical Sociology

The examination will last one hour and will consist of multiple choice questions with machine markable responses. Questions will take the form of a short statement summarizing a concept which the candidate should be able to understand. In each statement six key words or phrases will have been deleted and the candidate will be given a choice of words or phrases with which to replace the missing key word or phrase, a total of ninety choices for the whole paper. Candidates will indicate their choice by using a machine markable indicator.

Molecules in Medical Science

For details of the examination in this subject see the entry for Molecules in Medical Science under Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part IA, above. The Second M.B. Examination will be determined by the performance of students in Sections I and II only.

Preparing for Patients A

Preparing for Patients A will be assessed by the submission of a record of course-work, to be submitted by the first Monday of Full Easter Term.

Two workbook tasks (each of no more than 500 words) based on the home and practice visits will be handed in at the final review session. The tasks will explore the student's ability to analyse the process of rapport and relationship building with patients and understand the underlying relationship between disease and illness that influences these interactions. Students will be supported in this activity by a course guide, pro formas, and interview checklists. Two copies of each workbook task will be submitted, one to be returned to the student along with formative feedback, the other to be retained as evidence of satisfactory attendance and completion of the programme objectives. A satisfactory overall rating of the workbook tasks and attendance on the course is a necessary condition for successful completion of the Second M.B. Examination.

Second Veterinary M.B. Examination (Revised Regulations)

Farm Animal Husbandry

The examination will be held at the end of the Lent Term and is designed to test candidates' knowledge and understanding of the material taught in the Farm Animal Husbandry lectures, computer-aided learning packages, and practicals. The examination will last one hour and consist of a number of computer-marked questions. Candidates will be expected to attempt all questions.

Students will be provided with a specimen examination paper during the Michaelmas Term.

Homeostasis

For details of the examination in this subject see the entry for Homeostasis under Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part IA, above. The Second Vet.M.B. Examination will be determined by the performance of students in Sections I and II only. Candidates will be required to submit satisfactory practical notebooks to meet the requirements of the Second Vet.M.B. Examination regulation for diligent attendance.

Molecules in Medical Science

For details of the examination in this subject see the entry for Molecules in Medical Science under Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part IA, above. The Second Vet.M.B. Examination will be determined by the performance of students in Sections I and II only.

Preparing for the Veterinary Profession

This examination will consist of two parts.

The first part will test candidates' knowledge and understanding of safe working practices when working with animals or in agricultural environments. This test will also include questions on safe and humane handling and restraint of animals. The test will also consist of a number of computer marked questions. This will be an open book exercise. Students will be given the paper during the Easter Term and will be expected to return the completed question paper on, or before, the last day of the Easter Term.

The second part will be a requirement for candidates to submit written papers on one or more farms (or other agricultural enterprises) where they have 'seen farm practice'. At least one new report must be submitted by each student during their first academic year.

First-year students will be given specimen 'farm practice' reports to enable them to appreciate what is expected of them in the Michaelmas Term.

Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology

For details of the examination in this subject see the entry for Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology under Medical and Veterinary Sciences Tripos, Part IA, above. The Second Vet.M.B. Examination will be determined by the performance of students in Sections I and II only.


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Cambridge University Reporter, 6 December 2000
Copyright © 2011 The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.